Gladstone Centenary Essays

By David Bebbington; Roger Swift | Go to book overview

Contributors

David Bebbington is a Professor of History at the University of Stirling. His publications include The Nonconformist Conscience (1982), Evangelicalism in Modern Britain (1989), Victorian Nonconformity (1992) and Holiness in Nineteenth-Century England (2000) as well as William Ewart Gladstone: Faith and Politics in Victorian Britain (1994). He is one of the editors of the present volume.

Eugenio Biagini is a University Lecturer in Modern British History and a Fellow and Director of Studies in History at Robinson College, Cambridge. His publications include Liberty, Retrenchment and Reform: Popular Liberalism in the Age of Gladstone (1992), Citizenship and Community (1996) and Gladstone (2000).

Clyde Binfield is Professor Associate in History at the University of Sheffield. His publications include George Williams and the YMCA (1973), So Down To Prayers: Studies in English Nonconformity, 1780–1920 (1977) and Pastors and People: The Biography of a Baptist Church (1984); he has also co-edited The History of the City of Sheffield, 1843–1993 (3 vols, 1993) and Mesters to Masters: A History of the Cutlers' Company of Hallamshire (1997).

D. George Boyce is a Professor in the Department of Politics, University of Wales, Swansea. His publications include Nationalism in Ireland (3rd edition, 1996), The Irish Question and British Politics, 1868–1996 (new and revised edition, 1996) and (edited with Alan O'Day) Parnell in Perspective (1991).

David Brooks is a Lecturer in History at Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London. His publications include The Destruction of Lord Rosebery (1987) and The Age of Upheaval: Edwardian Politics, 1899–1914 (1995).

Stewart J. Brown is Professor of Ecclesiastical History at the University of Edinburgh. His publications include Thomas Chalmers and the Godly Commonwealth in Scotland (1982) – awarded the Saltaire Society History Prize – Scotland in the Age of the Disruption (edited with Michael Fry, 1993), William Robertson and the Expansion of Empire (1997), Piety and Power in Ireland, 1760–1960 (edited with D. W. Miller, 2000) and a number of articles and contributed book chapters. He has been coeditor of the Scottish Historical Review since 1993.

Eric J. Evans is Professor of Social History at the University of Lancaster. His publications include The Forging of the Modern State, 1783–1870 (2nd ed., 1996), The Great Reform Act of 1832 (2nd ed., 1994)), Political Parties in Britain, 1783–1867 (1985), Britain before the Reform Act: Politics and Society, 1815–32 (1989) and Sir Robert Peel: Statesmanship, Power and Party (1991). He is co-editor of the Lancaster Pamphlets series.

Anthony Howe is Senior Lecturer in International History at the London School of Economics. His publications include The Cotton Masters, 1830–1860 (1984) and Free Trade and Liberal England, 1846–1946 (1997). He has written widely on

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Gladstone Centenary Essays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Contributors vi
  • List of Illustrations viii
  • Preface x
  • Note xi
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes *
  • Gladstone, Chalmers and the Disruption of the Church of Scotland 10
  • Notes *
  • ‘the Strict Line of Political Succession’? Gladstone's Relationship with Peel: An Apt Pupil? 29
  • Notes 52
  • Gladstone and Homer 57
  • Notes *
  • Gladstone and Parliamentary Reform 75
  • Notes *
  • Gladstone, Liberalism and the Government of 1868–1874 94
  • Notes *
  • Gladstone and Cobden 113
  • Notes *
  • Networking through Sound Establishments: How Gladstone Could Make Dissenting Sense 133
  • Notes *
  • Gladstone and Irish Nationalism: Achievement and Reputation 163
  • Notes *
  • In the Front Rank of the Nation: Gladstone and the Unionists of Ireland, 1868–1893 184
  • Notes 199
  • Exportin ‘weatern & Beneficent Institutions’: Gladstone and Empire, 1880–1885 202
  • Notes *
  • Gladstone's Fourth Administration, 1892–1894 225
  • Notes *
  • ‘carving the Last Few Columns out of the Gladstonian Quarry’: the Liberal Leaders and the Mantle of Gladstone, 1898–1929 243
  • Notes 257
  • William Ewart Gladstone: A Select Bibliography 260
  • Index 277
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