Gladstone Centenary Essays

By David Bebbington; Roger Swift | Go to book overview

Preface

As this volume was in press, news came of the death of Professor Colin Matthew on 29 October 1999. His unexpected passing at the age of only 58 created a sense of shock in the scholarly community, especially amongst those who have taken an interest in the life of W. E. Gladstone. From its inception, Colin gave tremendous support to the project of holding an international conference to mark the centenary of the death of Gladstone. He participated in the conference at Chester, delivering, as the introduction below mentions, the opening public lecture. Colin was the obvious choice of speaker for the occasion because of his unparalleled expertise on the statesman. His first book, published in 1973, had described Gladstone as ‘for so long the unifier and inspirer of the Liberal party’ and for the next two decades he was occupied with explaining how that came to be. 1 Already Lecturer in Gladstone Studies at Christ Church, Oxford, Colin ran a seminar at Oxford on features of the statesman's career, produced articles on aspects of his activities and prepared the material that was to emerge in the two volumes which he described as his ‘extended biographical essay’ on Gladstone in 1986 and 1995.

The biographical study was based on the introductions to the successive volumes of Gladstone's diaries that Matthew edited. The series of diaries, inaugurated in 1968 by M. R. D. Foot, included two volumes edited by Foot and Matthew in 1974 and then a further ten volumes issued by Matthew alone from 1978 to 1994. This massive enterprise was on any estimate a triumph of perseverance, but it was far more. The introductions reinterpreted Gladstone's achievement by integrating the private with the public life of the statesman, so showing how the personal preoccupations with Christian reunion, for example – impinged on his conduct in national and international affairs. The footnotes in the diaries, copious but always unfussy, drew attention to the unpublished memoranda in the British Library whose significance Matthew fully appreciated. In later volumes some of them were published in the text of the diaries, together with selected correspondence and notes on cabinet meetings that greatly enhance the value of the edition. Colin was probably proudest of volume 14, the last to be issued. It contains three indexes: to the 20,000 or so individuals named in the diaries; to the roughly 21,000 books and articles that Gladstone recorded reading; and to the subjects mentioned in the printed material, including (a typical Matthew touch) topics ranging from card games to God. The index, let alone the remaining volumes of the edition, will forever remain an invaluable resource for the historian of the Victorian era. The successful publication of the diaries earned Matthew deserved recognition – a Fellowship of the British Academy in 1991 and a personal Professorship of Modern History at Oxford in the following year. It also brought him his next vast responsibility, the editing of The New Dictionary of National Biography, which he had taken more than half way to completion by the time of his

-x-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gladstone Centenary Essays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Contributors vi
  • List of Illustrations viii
  • Preface x
  • Note xi
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes *
  • Gladstone, Chalmers and the Disruption of the Church of Scotland 10
  • Notes *
  • ‘the Strict Line of Political Succession’? Gladstone's Relationship with Peel: An Apt Pupil? 29
  • Notes 52
  • Gladstone and Homer 57
  • Notes *
  • Gladstone and Parliamentary Reform 75
  • Notes *
  • Gladstone, Liberalism and the Government of 1868–1874 94
  • Notes *
  • Gladstone and Cobden 113
  • Notes *
  • Networking through Sound Establishments: How Gladstone Could Make Dissenting Sense 133
  • Notes *
  • Gladstone and Irish Nationalism: Achievement and Reputation 163
  • Notes *
  • In the Front Rank of the Nation: Gladstone and the Unionists of Ireland, 1868–1893 184
  • Notes 199
  • Exportin ‘weatern & Beneficent Institutions’: Gladstone and Empire, 1880–1885 202
  • Notes *
  • Gladstone's Fourth Administration, 1892–1894 225
  • Notes *
  • ‘carving the Last Few Columns out of the Gladstonian Quarry’: the Liberal Leaders and the Mantle of Gladstone, 1898–1929 243
  • Notes 257
  • William Ewart Gladstone: A Select Bibliography 260
  • Index 277
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 286

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.