Material Memories

By Marius Kwint; Christopher Breward et al. | Go to book overview

nine
The Construction of
Civic Memory in
Early Modern Norwich
Victor Morgan
Can we find her there, among the burghers of early modern Norwich? She who was the supposed daughter of Uranus and of Gaia, the Titaness Mnemosyne, the goddess of memory? Yes: in fact I think that it is possible to identify nine not entirely distinct manifestations of both retrospective and prospective civic memory in early modern Norwich.1 This involved:
1. The creation of a distinctly urban memory among the numerous migrants to the city.
2. What we may describe as the cultivation of the corporate lineage, and its further appropriation by individual families within the city who could not, as contemporary mores required, reach back into the past genealogically or often produce the offspring to enable them to reach forward into the future.
3. Closely related to manifestations of the civic lineage was the use of the civic regalia, its augmentation and its display as an instrument of both legitimization and constraint.
4. There is the civic portrait collection: both its inception in this period and the iconography of the portraits.
____________________
1
These categories would seem to constitute ‘modes of representation’, involving complex feedbacks of inputs and outputs: see Whitney Davis, ‘Towards an Archaeology of Thought’, in Ian Hodder (ed.), The Meaning of Things: Material Culture and Symbolic Expression (London, 1989), 202–9.

-183-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Material Memories
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 257

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.