The Diplomacy of Pragmatism: Britain and the Formation of NATO, 1942-1949

By John Baylis | Go to book overview

Appendix 2

THE OVERALL STRATEGIC PLAN, MAY 1947
(DO(47))44
(Also CoS(47)102(0)) (Retained by the Cabinet Office)

FUTURE DEFENCE POLICY
Report by the Chief of Staff

OBJECT

The object of this paper is to set out the fundamental principles which should govern our Future Defence Policy and to arrive at a clear statement of the basic requirements of our Strategy, on which the shape and size of our armed forces can subsequently be planned.

We have accordingly arranged the paper in two parts:‐

PART I. - Commonwealth Defence Policy. This Part concludes with a
definition of the fundamentals of our Defence Policy.

PART II. - The Strategy of Commonwealth Defence. This Part be-
gins with a statement of the basic requirements of our Strat-
egy and concludes with a statement in general terms of the
basic tasks of our armed forces and the principles which
should govern their shape and size in order to fulfil this
Strategy.

Any examination of Future Defence Policy inevitably gives rise to some consideration of long-term political and economic developments, since these affect our security quite as much as the shape and size of the armed forces. We have therefore attached at Annex our views on the political and economic objects which should be pursued in support of Commonwealth Defence Policy.


PART I. - COMMONWEALTH DEFENCE POLICY

International Relations

2. The fulfilment of the main object of the United Nations, the maintenance of world peace, depends on the ability and readiness of the Great Powers to keep the peace.

The supreme object of British policy is to prevent war, provided that this can be done without prejudicing our vital interests.

3. The United Kingdom, as the senior member of the British Common

-134-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Diplomacy of Pragmatism: Britain and the Formation of NATO, 1942-1949
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Diplomacy of Pragmatism *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Wartime Planning for a Postwar European Security Group, 1941-44 8
  • 2 - Emerging Differences between the Chiefs of Staff and the Foreign Office, 1944-45 19
  • 3 - Postwar Attitudes towards the Soviet Union 37
  • 4 - Towards a Treaty with France 49
  • 5 - The Western Union and the Brussels Pact 63
  • 6 - The Chiefs of Staff and the Continental Commitment 76
  • 7 - The Pentagon Talks, 22 March — 1 April 1948 92
  • 8 - The Washington Talks on Security, 6 July 1948 to 9 September 1948 98
  • 9 - Last-Minute Problems, 9 September 1948 — 28 March 1949 107
  • 10 - Conclusions and Achievements 116
  • Appendix 1 131
  • Appendix 2 134
  • Appendix 3 152
  • Appendix 4 157
  • Appendix 5 160
  • Sources 164
  • Notes 166
  • Select Bibliography 184
  • Index 186
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 194

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.