Three Days at Gettysburg: Essays on Confederate and Union Leadership

By Gary W. Gallagher | Go to book overview

Bibliographic Essay

READERS CAN LOCATE THE SOURCES ON WHICH THE AUTHORS BASED their essays by perusing the notes. For those interested in exploring other facets of the operations in Pennsylvania during June and July 1863, the best bibliography is Richard A. Sauers, Jr., comp., The Gettysburg Campaign, June 3—August 1, 1863: A Comprehensive, Selectively Annotated Bibliography (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, I982). Sauers listed more than 2,500 items, but more than fifteen years of additional scholarship has contributed a wealth of new works to the literature. Although the following books represent only a fraction of that mountain of material, they provide a range of narrative approaches, firsthand testimony, and interpretive insights.

The basic published collection of primary evidence is U.S. War Department, The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and ConfederateArmies (128 vols., index, and atlas, Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1880-1901). Series I, vol. 27, pts. I-3 of the Official Records (more popularly known as the OR) include nearly 3,500 pages of official reports, correspondence, orders, and other items pertinent to Gettysburg. Part I, vol. 5, of Janet B. Hewett and others, eds., Supplement to the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies (98 vols. to date, Wilmington, N.C.: Broadfoot, 1994-), offer an additional five hundred pages of material about both armies, including a number of Confederate reports that shed light on Pickett's Charge. Report of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, at the Second Session Thirty-eighth Congress. Army of the Potomac. Battle of Petersburg (Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1865) contains extensive comments about the campaign by various important Union officers and illuminates the politically charged atmosphere that often surrounded the Army of the Potomac's high command.

For important postwar accounts, see David L. Ladd and Audrey J. Ladd, eds., The Bachelder Papers: Gettysburg in Their Own Words (3 vols., Dayton, Ohio: Morningside, 1994-1995), which contains extensive correspondence between Bachelder and numerous veterans of the battle; vol. 3 of Papers of the Military Historical Society of Massachusetts (1895-1918; reprinted in 15 vols. with a general index, Wilmington, N.C.: Broadfoot, 1989-1990); Papers of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the

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