Three Days at Gettysburg: Essays on Confederate and Union Leadership

By Gary W. Gallagher | Go to book overview

Contributors

PETER S. CARMICHAEL is a member of the Department of History at Western Carolina University. The author of Lee's Young Artillerist: William R. J. Pegram, as well as several essays and articles in popular and scholarly journals, he is completing a study of Virginia slaveholders' sons and the formation of southern identity in the late antebellum years.

GARY W. GALLAGHER is a member of the Department of History at the University of Virginia. He is the author of Stephen Dodson Ramseur: Lee's Gallant General, Lee and His Generals in War and Memory, and The Confederate War, and editor of Antietam: Essays on the 1862 Maryland Campaign and Struggle for the Shenandoah: Essays on the 1864 Valley Campaign.

A. WILSON GREENE, who holds degrees in history from Florida State University and Louisiana State University, is executive director of Pamplin Park Civil War Site and former president of the Association for the Preservation of Civil War Sites. He is the author of Whatever You Resolve to Be: Essays on Stonewall Jackson and coauthor of The National Geographic Guide to the National Civil War Battlefields.

D. SCOTT HARTWIG, who studied under E. B. Long at the University of Wyoming, has published several articles and essays on Civil War military history as well as The Battle of Antietam and the Maryland Campaign of 1862: A Bibliography. He currently is completing a full-scale study of the 1862 Maryland campaign.

ROBERT K. KRICK grew up in California but has lived and worked on the Virginia battlefields for more than twenty-five years. He has written dozens of articles and ten books, the most recent being Stonewall Jackson at Cedar Mountain and Conquering the Valley: Stonewall Jackson at Port Republic.

GARY M. KROSS attended Marquette University and has been a Licensed Battlefield Guide at Gettysburg for a dozen years. His publications include numerous articles on Gettysburg for Blue & Gray Magazine.

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