Design Culture in Liverpool, 1880-1914: The Origins of the Liverpool School of Architecture

By Christopher Crouch | Go to book overview

Notes
1
Q. Hughes, ‘Before the Bauhaus’, Architectural History, vol. 25, 1982. Hughes lays great, and I think undue, emphasis upon the role of T. G. Jackson in the formulation of the ideas that were to motivate the School, thus distorting the value of subsequent events. These are examined in more detail in Chapter Four.
2
An autobiographical account of Conway's involvement in the Association can be found in W. M. Conway, Episodes in a Varied Life, Country Life, 1932.
3
‘Transactions of the National Association for the Advancement of Art and its

Application to Industry: Liverpool Meeting 1888’, ‘Objects of the Association’, p. viii.

4
Ibid., H. Sumners, ‘The Practical Outcome of the Art Congress’, p. 205.
5
Ibid., E. Seward, ‘The Development of Local Influences for the Advancement of Art’, p. 322: ‘South Kensington has practically been for more than thirty years the one state aided organisation for the promotion of national training in art over the country, our admiration or appreciation of some of the work it has been doing ought not to be too great to prevent our inquiring if that system is being everywhere applied in the best way.’
6
Ibid., G. Simonds, ‘Sculpture in its Relation to Architecture’, p. 375.
7
Ibid., P. Geddes, ‘Economic Arguments for the Encouragement of the Fine Arts’, p. 337.
8
Ibid., J. D. Sedding, ‘Things Amiss with our Arts and Industries’, p. 347: ‘All the lecturings and teachings, and prizes and principles of art in the world are of no use so long as you don't surround your men with happy influences and beautiful things.’
9
Ibid., pp. 344–45.
10
Ibid., p. 349: ‘The one man who above all others has inspired hope and brought life and light into modern manufacture is William Morris. And this because, a very giant in design, cultured at the feet of antiquity, learned in the history of art, rich in faith, prodigal of his strength, he has united in his own person the two factors of industrial art which before were divided.’
11
Ibid., p. 354: ‘And yet, remember that if we have misled you in the art revolution of this half century, there are aspirations behind revolutions. The results may not be satisfactory, yet the motives which actuated us were good. Our Gothic revival has been a solid, and not a trifling, transient, piece of art history. It has enriched the crafts by impetus and initiation. It has endured two generations of art-workers with a new passion. It has been the health giving spark – the ozone of modern art.’
12
Ibid., W. Morris, ‘Art and its Producers’, p. 238.
13
Ibid., B. Champneys, ‘Style’. In his discussion of style, and the Gothic in particular, ‘the only real and true style which the modern world has seen’ (p. 173), Champneys discusses Morris's ‘pessimistic view of the prospects of architecture’ (p. 172), demonstrating the bewilderment that many in the Arts and Crafts movement felt about Morris's move away from the assumption that the arts underpinned all cultural activity. Morris's gradual disengagement from the arts, brought into focus by the Bloody Sunday debacle of a year previously, and the decline of the Socialist League from a radical working class organisation to a debating club, far from disillusioning Morris in terms of politics, galvanised him to greater political activity at the expense of aesthetic activity. Cf. P. Thompson, The Work of William Morris, Quartet, 1977, pp. 227–32.

-88-

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