Design Culture in Liverpool, 1880-1914: The Origins of the Liverpool School of Architecture

By Christopher Crouch | Go to book overview

Notes
1
Letter, Reilly to Lever, 23 April 1904, Charles Reilly's letterbooks, Liverpool University Archives no. D207/2/1,.
2
C. Reilly, Scaffolding in the Sky, Routledge, 1938, p. 93.
3
‘[Lever] kindly said I was at liberty to suggest any such way of using up his surplus money provided he was equally free to refuse’, ibid., p. 123. See also pp. 124–28.
4
Liverpool Daily Post and Mercury, 11 July 1906.
5
E. Hubbard and M. Shippobottom, A Guide to Port Sunlight Village, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1988, p. 3.
6
22 February 1909, Liverpool University Senate Papers, vol. 3 no. 23, Liverpool University Archives.
7
To be made full Professor in 1912.
8
Details of Adshead's early career can be found in an unpublished autobiographical manuscript in the Liverpool University Archives, Architects I have Known, no. D 247/1. The following paragraph creates a less than heroic vision of the Department's inception; ‘I did fourteen competitions without success. I seemed to fail in everything and was reduced to running my office with one boy, and busying myself with reading papers on architecture before societies. When one day through the instrumentality of my friend Professor Reilly, I received an invitation to occupy the newly funded Chair of Civic Design at the Liverpool University.’
9
A. Adshead, ‘Style in Architectural Draughtsmanship’, RIBA Journal, vol. XIV, 1907, p. 485.
10
P. Abercrombie, ‘Editorial’, Town Planning Review, vol. 1:1, 1909, p. 1.
11
S. Adshead, ‘An Introduction to Civic Design’, Town Planning Review, vol. 1:1, 1909.
12
The article was broken down into four parts; ‘The Prearranged Plan’, ‘Historical Retrospect’, ‘Sociological Aspect’, ‘The Influence of the City on City Life’. This compares to such headings in Robinson's The Improvement of Towns and Cities as ‘Beauty in the Street’, ‘Aesthetic Phase of Social and Philanthropic Effort’, ‘Aesthetic Phase of Education Effort’, ‘Means to secure Civic Aesthetics’.
13
See also ‘Under Professor Reilly's guidance the Liverpool School has to come to be recognised as the first, if not the only school in England which stands for monumental architecture and Classic tradition’ (p. 2). ‘Like the Liverpool School of Architecture of which it is a department, our school of Town Planning has a distinct point of view. It believes and teaches that a well organised society expresses its existence only in a well directed and well planned way.’ (p. 6). S. Adshead, ‘The School of Civic Design at the Liverpool University’, unpublished manuscript, no. D 247/2, Liverpool University Archives.
14
‘The teaching of Design at this school [The Liverpool School] is based on the methods of the Ecole Des Beaux Arts in Paris and on those of the great American Schools of Architecture adapted to meet our somewhat different requirements.’ Architectural Review, August 1910, p. 41.
15
Adshead, ‘An Introduction to Civic Design’, p. 10.
16
‘Rome in the laying out of her forums, her palaces, her pleasure places, and her public ways, was unity itself; and the adjustment of her symmetrical units, unsymmetrically arranged, offers solutions of problems so varied and of so great an interest as to remain to this day a precedent for axial connection unrivalled in the world,’ ibid., p. 5.
17
‘Still it is the genius of Louis XIV, assisted by his architects Bullet and Blondel, and by his landscape architect Andre le Notre, that we are indebted for the great Champs Elysee and the Place de l'Etoile, and it is they who first originated the

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