Business History in Latin America: The Experience of Seven Countries

By Carlos Dávila; Rory Miller et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX
Regional Studies and Business History
in Mexico since 1975
Mario Cerutti

Research on the origins, development and activities of business groups in Mexico accelerated relatively quickly after the middle of the 1970s.1 During the following decade it attained an obvious importance. An analysis of a large proportion of the published work allows one to pick out three significant features. First, developments in this particular field of historical research coincided with the growth of regional studies in Mexico. Second, from the very beginning these studies of businessmen were directly linked to the broader analysis of economic and social history. Third, if one adopts these two characteristics as the major points of reference, then one should also add that research interest has centred, above all, on the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, with a particular concentration on the period between the 1840s and 1920.2

Before commencing the detailed analysis of the literature, one point must be emphasised. In contrast to several of the other chapters in this volume which review books and articles published both in Latin America and those published overseas, this discussion is based almost entirely on studies published in Mexico itself. In part this reflects the substantial volume of research produced in Mexico (in comparison with the work on business history in other countries). However, it also draws attention to the way in which the work undertaken in Mexico since the mid-1970s has changed perceptions of business history. It has resulted in conclusions quite unlike those of the general histories which were published before the 1980s. This emphasis also makes for a reading of Mexican business history which is rather different from that of many foreign scholars, especially in the United States, who often give little credence to the idea that domestic

____________________
1
An earlier version of this paper was published in Revista Interamericana de Bibliografía 43 (1993), 375–93.
2
The arguments in this chapter are based on extensive reading in the studies cited in the bibliography on Mexico at the end of the book. Rather than cluttering the text with extensive footnotes and citations, it seems preferable to refer the reader to the large number of regional studies cited in the bibliography which provide the evidence for the arguments developed here.

-116-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Business History in Latin America: The Experience of Seven Countries
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 241

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.