Central Italy and Rome, Handbook for Travellers

By Karl Baedeker | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION.
Page
I. Travelling Expenses. Moneyix
II. Languagexi
III. Passports. Custom House. Luggagexi
IV. Season and Plan of Tourxii
V. Gratuities. Guides. Public Safety. Beggingxii
VI. Railwaysxiv
VII. Motoring and Cyclingxvii
VIII. Hotels. Pensions. Private Apartmentsxviii
IX. Restaurants. Cafés. Birrerie. Osterie. Cigarsxx
X. Sights, Theatres, Shops, etcxxiii
XI. Post Office. Telegraphxxv
XII. Climate of Rome. Healthxxvi
History of the City of Romexxix
List of Roman Emperors and Popesxl
Ancient Artxlv
Mediæval and Modern Roman Artlx
Glossary of Art Termslxxx
Bibliographylxxxi

'Thou art the garden of the world, the home Of all Art yields, and Nature can decree; E'en in thy desert, what is like to thee? Thy very weeds are beautiful, thy waste More rich than other climes, fertility, Thy wreck a glory, and thy ruin graced With an immaculate charm which cannot be defaced.'

Byron.


I. Travelling Expenses. Money.

Expenses . The cost of a tour in Italy need not exceed that incurred in other frequented parts of the Continent. The average expenditure of a single traveller may be estimated at 20-25 francs per day, or at 15-20 francs when a prolonged stay is made at one place; but persons acquainted with the language and habits of the country may easily restrict their expenses to still narower limits. Those who travel as members of a party also effect a considerable saving. When ladies are of the party the expenses are generally greater.

Money . The French monetary system is now in use throughout .the whole of Italy. The franc (lira or franco) contains 100 centesimi; 1 fr. 25 c. = 1s. (comp. the money-table at p. ii). In copper (bronzo or rame) there are coins of 1, 2, 5, and 10 centesimi, in nickel pieces

-ix-

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