Central Italy and Rome, Handbook for Travellers

By Karl Baedeker | Go to book overview

is the pilgrimage-church of Santa Maria della Consolazione, the interior of which was begun in 1508 by Cola Matteuccio da Caprarola, while the exterior was completed in 1516-24 by Ambr. da Milano and Fr. de Vito Lombardo. It is in the form of a Greek cross and covered with a dome, added in 1606. The arms of the cross are also surmounted with domes, and are polygonal in shape with the exception of the choir, which is semicircular. The exterior is remarkable for its simple and massive style, and the interior for its symmetrical proportions and the delicately graduated ornamentation of its pillars. The Castle (Rocca) affords a fine view.

From Todi to Narni, 28 M., viâ Rosaro, Castel Todino (1433 ft.) and San Gemini. About 2 M. short of the last and about ½ M. to the E. of the road, on the ancient, now abandoned Via Flaminia (p. 131), are the ruins of the once prosperous Carstilae. The best-preserved relic is a city-gate, known as the Arco di San Damiano. [From this point, with the aid of a guide from San Gemini, we may ascend the Monte Torre Maggiore (3678 ft.; to the S.E.) in ca. 2 hrs.; the way passes L'Eremita (2570 ft.), an old convent.] On the highroad, about ½ M. farther on, is the mineral spring (with a well-house) of San Gemini. From San Gemini (7 ½ M. from Narni) two roads descend gradually to the beautiful valley of the Nera, one leading to the S.E. to Terni (see p. 93; diligence from Todi iv 7 hrs., 5 fr.), and the other to the S. to Narni (p. 96).


10. From Perugia to Foligno and Orte
(Rome).

77 M. Railaway. Express (after Foligno only) in 4 ¼ hrs. (fares ca. 15 fr. 40, 10 fr. 80 c., 7 fr.); ordinary train in 4 ¾ brs. (14 fr. 40, 10 fr. 10, 6 fr. 50 c.). Lightning express on Mon., Wed., & Frid. in summer in 4 hrs. 5 min. (15 fr. 85, 11 fr. 10 c.). — The most interesting points are Assisi, Spoleto, and Terni. It is sometimes advisable to exchange the railway for the road; in this way the Tomb of the Volumnii (p. 78) may be visited by driving from Perugia to Assisi (14 ½ M.; one horse carr. 10, there and back 15 fr., two-horse carr. 25 fr.), and the Temple of Clitaninus (p. 88) between Foligno and Spoleto. — From Perugia to Rome, 129 M., express in 6-6 ½, ordinary train in 7 ½ hrs.

Perugia, see p. 67. — The train descends, passing through several tunnels. To the left we obtain a glimpse of the tomb of the Volumnii (p. 78) and a pleasing retrospect of Perugia. — 7 M. Ponte San Giovanni. The train crosses the Tiber, which was the ancient frontier between Etruria and Umbria and bore breaks through the Umbrian mountains in a S.W. direction. We then cross the Chiaggio (p. 64). — The valley which the train now follows as far as Spoleto (p. 88) forms a prolongation of the upper valley of the Tiber, to the W. of the main ridge of the Apennines. — 13 M. Bastia, whence a diligence plies once daily (in 2 hrs., 2 fr.) to (7 ½ M. to the S.W.) Bettona (1164 ft.; Alb. Agata Tiberi, R. 1 fr.), the Etruscan Vettona, situated on a hill above the Chiaggio, with the remains of old walls.

15 M. Assisi (715 ft.). The town lies on a hill to the left (cab 1 ½ fr.; hotel-omn. see p. 80). Those who do not intend to spend a night at Assisi should visit the pilgrimage-church of Santa Maria degli Angeli before ascending to the town. The church lies on the other side of the railway a few minutes from the station.

-79-

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