Central Italy and Rome, Handbook for Travellers

By Karl Baedeker | Go to book overview

Marittima (Rail. Restaurant; Alb. Moderno, R. 1½-2 fr.) passengers for the line to Rome change carriages (see R. 15). The town (325 ft.) lies on the hill to the right.

127 M. Ancona.


14. Ancona and its Environs. Osimo.
Loreto.

Hotels (none of the first class; colop. p. xviii). Roma E Pace (Pl. d; D, 4), Via Giacomo Leopardi 3, with restaurant, R. from 2 fr., omn. 1 fr.; Vittoria (Pl. b; C, 3), Corso Vittorio Emanuele, R. 3-5, B. 1½, déj. 3½, D. 5, pens. 8-15 fr. — Milano (Pl. C; C, 4), Via Venti-Nove Settembre; Alb. Della Ferrovia, near the station, mediocre.

Cafés.Antonelli, at the, corner of the Via Marsala and Via Stamura (Pl. D, 4); Stoppani & Leva, in the Corso Vitt. Emanuele, at the corner of the Piazza Roma (Pl. D, 4); Dorico, Piazza del Teatro (Pl. C, 3). — Beer. Gambrinus Halle, Corso Vitt. Emannele 29. — Trattorie in the above-mentioned hotels; also, Picchio, Piazza Roma.

post office (Pl. D, 4), Piazza Roma (Pl. D, 4). — telegraph office (open all night), same place (first floor, to the left). — theatre, Piazza del Teatro (Pl. C, 3).

Cabs. One-horse cab from station to town, incl. luggage, 1, at night 1½ fr.; two-horse 1½ or 2 fr. For 1 hr., 1½ or 2 fr.; each ½ hr. more, 60 or 80 c. — Beyond the town, 2 fr. 50 or 3 fr. 60 c. for 1 hr.; each ½ hr. more, 1 fr. 15 or 1 fr. 70 c. — Tramway from the station through the Strada Nazionale to the Piazza del Teatro (Pl. C, 3; 15 c.), and thence viâ the Piazza Cavour to the Pian San Lazzaro (15 c., 10 c.).

Steamboats of the Navigazione Generale Italiana once a fortnight, on the way from Venice to Bari, Brindisi, Alexandria, and Port Said; once a week for Brindisi, Corfu, Patras, the Piræus, and Constantinople; and vice versâ. — Steamboats of the Società di Navigazione Puglia once a week on the way from Venice to Bari, Brindisi, and Albania, and also on the way from Trieste to Dalmatia; and vice versa. The boats of the Società Ungaro-Croata ply direct to Fiume twice or thrice a week.

Sea-Baths, near the station (Pl. A, 6). Warm Baths, Piazza Stamura (Pl. E, 4).

British Vice-Consul, Edward A. Kane. — Lloyd's Agent, Umberto Servadio.

Ancona, the capital of a province, with 33,337 inhab., of whom upwards of 6000 are Jews, and possessing an excellent harboar, is beautifully situated between the promontories of Monte Astagno (Pl. C, 6) and Monte Guasco (Pl. C, 1). The duties and harbour dues produce an annual revenue of over 18,000,000 fr. Coals and raw sugar are the chief imports, asphalt is the chief export. The province contains sulphur-mines, silk-factories, paper-mills, and vineyards.

Ancona was founded about 400 B.C. by Doric Greeks from Syracuse, and thence named Dorica Ancon (i. e. 'elbow', from the shape of the promontory). It was afterwards a Roman colony, and the harbour (see below) was enlarged by Trajan. Ancona belonged to the Pentapolis Maritima (p. 124). After the beginning of the Christian era it repeatedly recovered from the ravages of the Goths and others, and in 1532 was made over by Gonzaga to Pope Clement VII., who built a fort and garrisoned it. Ancona is also frequently mentioned as a fortress of strategic

-133-

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