Central Italy and Rome, Handbook for Travellers

By Karl Baedeker | Go to book overview

Museo Civico is established in the church of the Annunziata, completed in 1509. The painter Carlo Maratta (1625-1713) was born at Camerino.

47 M. Matelica (1168 ft.; Alb. Aquila d'Oro), a town with 2713 inbab., possessing pictures by Palmezzano ( 1501) and Eusebio di San Giorgio ( 1512) in the church of San Francesco dei Zoccolanti, and other paintings in the Palazzo Piersanti. — 51½ M. Cerreto d'Esi; 54 M. Albacina see below; change carriages for Jesi and Ancona). — 59½ M. Fabriano, see below.


15. From Ancona to Foligno (Orte, Rome).

80 M. Railway 3 3/4-5 1/4 hrs. (fares 15 fr., 10 fr. 50, 6 fr. 75 c.; express 16 fr. 50, 11 fr. 55, 7 fr. 50 c.). To Rome (183 M.) in 8-11 1/4 hrs. (fares by ordinary train 33 fr. 5, 23 fr., 14 fr. 85 c.). Best views to the left.

To (5 M.) Falconara Marittima, see p. 133. — Here the train diverges to the S.W. into the valley of the Esino (Lat. Aesis), which it crosses at (10 1/2 M.) Chiaravalle.

17 1/2 M. Jesi (235 ft.; Alb. Sant' Antonio, Corso Vitt. Emanuele, R. 1 1/2 fr., very fair), a town with 23,825 inhab., was the ancient Aesis. The picturesque town-walls, dating from the middle ages, are in good preservation. The Cathedral is dedicated to the martyr St. Septimius, the first bishop of Jesi (308). The Palazzo Pubblico ( 1487-1503) bears the town-arms within an elaborate Renaissance border. The interior and the library contain works by Lorenzo Lotto. Jesi was the birthplace of the Emp. Frederick II. ( 1194-1250) and of Giov. Batt. Pergolese (b. 1710; d. 1736 at Pozzuoli), the composer.

The valley contracts, and the train crosses the river twice. 26 M. Castelplanio. The village of Maiolati (1340 ft.), 3 M. to the E., was the birthplace of Gasparo Spontini ( 1774-1851), the composer. — Beyond (30 1/2 M.) Serra San Quirico the line threads a long tunnel. — 39 1/2 M. Albacina; to Porto Civitanova, see p. 139.

44 1/2 M. Fabriano (1066 ft.; Alb. Campana, Piazza Garibaldi, R. 1 1/2-1 3 /4 fr.), an episcopal see with 9586 inhab., noted since the 14th cent. for its paper-manufactories, lies in a depression between two heights, near the sites of the ancient Tuficum and Attidium. The Town Hall contains ancient inscriptions and a small collection of pictures. The churches of San Niccolò, San Benedetto, and Santa Lucia, and the private houses Casa Morichi and Casa Fornari, contain pictures of the local school (see p. 68).

About 5 1/2 M. to the N. of Fabriano, in the parish of Genga, lies the village of Rosenga, below which a cart-road descends the valley of the Sentino to the E. to the (1/2 hr.) Stalactite Cavern of Frasassi. At the entrance of the cavern, which is 1/4 M. long, stands a chapel erected by Leo XII. — From Fabriano to Urbino, see R. 16; to Porta Civitanova, see pp. 141-139.

Beyond Fabriano the train skirts the brook Giano, and penetrates the central Apennine chain by a tunnel 1 1/4 M. long.

At (54 1/2 M.) Fossato di Vico (to Arezzo and Fossato, R. 8) we enter the plain of the Chiaggio. To the left on the hill, Palaz-

-141-

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