Central Italy and Rome, Handbook for Travellers

By Karl Baedeker | Go to book overview

only of the ancient foundations is preserved on the S.E. side of the garden-wall. Unpretending inn, with view-tower. The view embraces the sea, the coast from Terracina to Cività Vecchia, the Volscian and Sabine Mts., Rome and the Campagna, and below the spectator the beautiful Alban Mts. The distant view, generally obscured by mist, is seen to the best advantage immediately before sunrise, after sunset, or when a passing shower has cleared the atmosphere.

From Monte Cavo to Nemi, about 1 ½ hr. (guide from Rocca di Papa, 1-1 ½ fr., convenient though not necessary if the following directions be carefully observed). A steep and stony footpath descends from the S.E. angle of the top, and in 8-10 min. joins an easy path from the Campo di Annibale, which we follow to the right. Fine view of the Lago di Nemi and the sea. About 25 min. farther on a path diverges to the left and another to the right, but our route leads straight on. At the fork 10 min. farther we keep to the right, at the (10-12 min.) next fork to the left, and in 1 min. reach a broad road, which we follow to the right for 12 min. when we turn to the left. At the (3 min.) spring we turn to the left, then to the right almost immediately and follow a stony path which soon brings us in sight of Nemi.


3. The Sabine Mountains.

That chain of the Apennines which descends abruptly and bounds the Roman plain on the E., named Sabine Mts. from the ancient inhabitants, attains a height of 4490 ft. and is full of interest for lovers of the picturesque. It forms the margin of the mountain-range on the side facing the Roman depression occupied by volcanoes (comp. p. 428). Mt. Soracte (p. 108) and Cape Circeo (p. 503) are its isolated outliers. The Volscian Mts. (p. 495), to the S.E. of the Alban Mts., form a continuation of the great Apennine system. The unfruitful limestone rock has been covered by fertile volcanic ashes, and consequently has been made capable of bearing luxuriant crops. The olive-trees of the district are famous. — As a rule the Inns are good, though plain, but enquiry as to charges should be made beforehand; usual charge for board and lodging 5-6 fr., and ½ fr. gratuity. — Carriages are not always to be had except at Tivoli. The public conveyances are not recommended when ladies are of the party.

Those whose time is short must be satisfied with a visit to Tivoli, which was a favourite summer-resort of the Romans in the time of Horace. A fine day in April or May, when the vegetation is at its freshest, is the best time for this excursion. Subiaco also may be visited in a day. — If several days are devoted to the Sabine Mts., and they are well worth it, the following tour may be made: 1st day, from Rome by early train to Tivoli, thence in the evening or the next morning to Subiaco (p. 479); 2nd day, visit the monasteries in the morning, and in the afternoon walk or drive to Olevano (p. 484); 3rd day, walk or take the diligence to Valzontone (p. 496) or Palestrina (p. 482), and return thence by rail to Rome (or to Segni, comp. p. 496). Those who wish to reserve Tivoli, the culminating point, for the end may proceed as follows: 1st day, from Rome by early train to Palestrina or Valmontone and thence wall or take the diligence to Olevano; 2nd, to Subiaco; 3rd, to Tivoli; 4th, back to Rome. — A pleasant drive may be taken from Tivoli to Subiaco or Genazzano (pp. 479, 484; 3 ½-4 hrs.).

-469-

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