Central Italy and Rome, Handbook for Travellers

By Karl Baedeker | Go to book overview

Close by the town itself is the Villa Sarsina, formerly Aldobrandini, commanding pretty views; we reach it by ascending from the Piazza, crossing the rails, and then following the Via Pietro Aldobrandini, finally turning to the left. Opposite the entrance is the former Villa Albani, now the Ospizio Marino (for scrofulous children). Continuing along the Via Pietro Aldobrandini and ascending the hill straight in front, we come upon (8 min.) the remains of an antique wall. Fine survey of the town and sea. The Via della Galleria, a shady avenue, leads from this point round the back of the Villa Borghese to Nettuno (see below).

Excursionsby Small Boat (comp. p. 494) afford picturesque views of the beach with its numerous ruins. The promontory upon which the lighthouse (Faro) stands is pierced by ancient passages ('Grotte di Nerone'), which lead to a large villa, probably once belonging to the emperors. The so-called Arco Muto, a little to the N.W., has recently een walled up. — The farther we retreat from the land the freer a view do we obtain of the beautiful Monte Circeo (p. 503).

The Railway from Anzioto Nettuno (2 M., fares 35, 25 c.) follows the highroad (½ hr. on foot). Adjoining the railway signalbox No. 36 is the side-entrance to the —

Villa Borghese, which is surrounded by fine shady trees. When occupied by the family the villa can be visited only with a special permesso, to be obtained at the Pal. Borghese (p. 213) in Rome (at other times, fee 25 c.). The main entrance (usually closed) is opposite the Casino, which is said to occupy the site of the ancient Arx. — From the gate of the villa to Nettuno, ½ M.

Nettuno (Rail. Restaurant; Calfè Nettuno, in the Piazza; Trattoria della Campana, Via Vittorio Emanuele Terzo 8), a small place with 5072 inhab., a fort built in 1496 for Pope Alexander VI., and narrow, winding streets, depends for its interest on its picturesque situation. It is said to have been once a settlement of the Saracens. The native costume of the women is now seldom worn, even on holidays.

A coast-road leads to the E. from Nettuno, past an artillery-range (Poligono d'Artigleria), to the (7 ½ M.) Torre Astura, where there are numerous remains of Roman villas, and where Cicero also once possessed a villa. The tower, connected with the mainland by a bridge, belonged to a castle in which Prince Conradin of Swabia vainly sought refuge with Jacopo Frangipani after the battle of Tagliacozzo in 1268.


6. The Volscian Mountains and the
Railway to Terracina.

The Volscian mountain-range (Monti Lepini or Monti dei Volsci), which culminates in the Semprevisa (5040 ft.), to the S. of Carpineto, is separated on the E. from the principal chain of the Apennines by the valley of the Sacco, and on the N. from the Alban Mts. by a narrow depression; it extends to the S. as far as the Bay of Gaeta, and on the W. is bounded by a dreary and in some places marshy plain adjoining

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