Big Bill Haywood and the Radical Union Movement

By Joseph R. Conlin | Go to book overview

3

Undesirable Citizen

Haywood had little time to ponder the IWW when he returned to Denver from Chicago. The Western Federation was pledged to join the new union but was not yet a part of it in 1905; official affiliation required the endorsement of the miners' convention. Moreover, while Haywood's interest in national industrial unionism did not flag, he was still secretary‐ treasurer of the WFM and there was more than enough business with the miners to keep him busy. The tragic Cripple Creek strike was limping toward its conclusion, and Haywood was concerned with assisting the many miners forced to look elsewhere for employment. During the autumn of 1905 he toyed briefly with the idea of organizing a cowboys' union for the Industrial Workers of the World through his brother-in‐ law, Tom Minor, but little came of the notion.

Haywood's relations with Charles Moyer were outwardly friendly, but the union's setback at Cripple Creek had caused tension between the two. Still, Haywood's position seemed secure when the episode occurred which, while it did not maintain Haywood's position in Denver, catapulted the burly westerner to national and even international prominence. In one sense it is a most easy tale to relate, for the undisputed facts are few. The broad implications of the case which made it a cause célèbre, the passions and the invective which it inspired, and its significant effects on the career of Big Bill Haywood, require more extensive discussion.

The chain of events known to posterity as "The Haywood Case" began late on the evening of December 30, 1905. Frank

-52-

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Big Bill Haywood and the Radical Union Movement
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Big Bill Haywood and the Radical Union Movement *
  • Big Bill Haywood and the Radical Union Movement *
  • Preface vii
  • Contents *
  • 1 - Worker 1
  • 2 - Unionist 20
  • 3 - Undesirable Citizen 52
  • 4 - The Eminent Man 77
  • 5 - Wobbly 118
  • 6 - Socialist 148
  • 7 - Bête Noire 170
  • 8 - Communist 191
  • 9 - Frustration of a Radical 210
  • Bibliographical Note 215
  • Notes to Chapters 219
  • Index 241
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