Lynch Street: The May 1970 Slayings at Jackson State College

By Tim Spofford | Go to book overview

2

MAYDAY IN
AMERIKA

The essential American soul is hard, isolate,
stoic, and a killer. It has never melted.

—D. H. Lawrence

In a tree-shaded park in downtown Jackson, Mississippi, a student from Kent State University addressed a small crowd. While facing his listeners, Tom D'Floure fidgeted with the zipper on his gold jacket—a jacket the Ohio student did not need down here in the eighty-degree heat. At the microphone, he told the crowd about the killings on his campus just five days before, when National Guardsmen had turned their M-1 rifles on his fellow students, killing four of them.

"Those [students] shot weren't the ones throwing rocks," he said, shifting nervously from one foot to the other. "Allison Krause, whom I knew, was nonviolent. She was just there to watch. Another person killed was an ROTC student. It's kind of ironic that he'd get it."

While the student from Ohio spoke, the crowd of about 125 Mississippi youths sat on the fallen oak leaves in the park and listened.

"If you give a scared soldier a loaded rifle, someone just might get shot, and someone did," D'Floure added.

After he finished speaking, the crowd applauded and a black student with a beard and Afro hairdo rose to speak. He was thirty-five years old and a veteran. He was Henry Thompson, a student at Jackson State College.

"White people are reaping what they've sown!" Thompson told the crowd, his amplified voice echoing off the churches, stores, and office buildings that surrounded the park. "If they had left us in Africa and hadn't been so greedy to have us here to pick cotton, we wouldn't have a lot of this trouble today."

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lynch Street: The May 1970 Slayings at Jackson State College
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Lynch Street - The May 1970 Slayings at Jackson State College *
  • Contents *
  • 1 - Strange Roots *
  • 2 - Mayday in Amerika *
  • 3 - The Miniriot *
  • 4 - By the Magnolia Tree *
  • 5 - Jacktwo *
  • 6 - Yoknapatawpha in Black *
  • 7 - Crisis *
  • 8 - Majesty of the Law *
  • 9 - Showdown *
  • 10 - Nixon's Court *
  • Epilogue *
  • Sources and Methods *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 219

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.