Responses: On Paul de Man's Wartime Journalism

By Werner Hamacher; Neil Hertz et al. | Go to book overview

Paul de Man: A Chronology, 1919-1949

1919

6 December: Paul Adolph Michel Deman born in Antwerp, son of Jan Robert de Man (b. 1890) and Magdalena Maria Adolphina de Braey (b. 1893). Father, known as Robert (Bob), grandson of the Flemish poet Jan van Beers, is manufacturer of medical instruments and x-ray equipment, accomplished amateur musician. Uncle, Robert's brother, is politician and socialist theorist Hendrik (Henri) de Man (b. 1885). PDM has one sibling, Hendrik, born 1915. Family lives in Antwerp, with summer house in countryside north of city at Kalmthout.


1933

30 January: Hitler chancellor of German Reich.

April: Hendrik de Man leaves University of Frankfurt, where he held chair in social psychology and was involved in socialist and anti-Nazi political activities, and returns to Brussels; teaches at Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), leader in Belgian socialist party, Parti Ouvrier Belge (POB).

24-25 December: Meeting in Brussels, POB Congress elects Hendrik de Man vice-president and adopts his "Plan du travail," program to end mass unemployment by public works and structural changes including nationalized control of credit, banking, and some monopolies.


1935

29 March: POB, breaking with tradition, joins coalition Van Zeeland government; Hendrik de Man named Minister of Public Works and Unemployment Reduction.

3 October: Italian troops invade Ethiopia.


1936

7 March: Hitler dissolves Treaty of Locarno, remilitarizes Rhineland.

3 May: Popular Front wins majority in French elections; Léon Blum heads government.

20 June: Death of PDM's brother Hendrik in bicycle accident at railroad crossing.

24 June: Second Van Zeeland government; Hendrik de Man is Minister of Finance.

16 July: Outbreak of Spanish Civil War.

19 August: Moscow purge trials begin; within eighteen months, almost 100 Soviet Central Committee members elected in I934 tried and executed.

Fall: PDM's last year of high school at Koninklijke Athenaeum, Antwerp, begins.

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