Syria: Society, Culture, and Polity

By Richard T. Antoun; Donald Quataert | Go to book overview

ONE Syrian Political Culture: A Historical Perspective

Philip S. Khoury

Political culture in Syria, indeed throughout the Fertile Crescent, did not change abruptly with the break up of the Ottoman Empire and the imposition of European rule after World War I. Rather, the exercise of political power followed the Ottoman model for thirty or more years after the collapse of the empire. It was only after World War II that this continuity was broken.

In order to support this contention, three periods of modern Syrian history, stretching from the mid-nineteenth century until the 1960s, need to be examined. Because the formation of political culture in Syria was intimately linked to the formation of a single elite in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, first it will be necessary to explain how this elite emerged and the character of its political role. This should tell us something about the foundations of politics in Syria. Then I will discuss the continuity of the elite's political role after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire--that is, between the two world wars, when Syria was ruled by the French. Finally, I will suggest the process by which this elite lost power after World War II, in the era of Syrian independence, and how and why political culture began to assume new forms and dimensions.

There always have been striking similarities between political developments in Syria and in the neighboring Arab regions. Political culture in the last century was shaped by a mixture of Ottoman administrative practices, local Arab traditions, and European intellectual and material influences. It was urban and rooted most deeply in the larger provincial cities of Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, and Iraq. In Syria's case, independent rural

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Syria: Society, Culture, and Polity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 172

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.