Beyond Silenced Voices: Class, Race, and Gender in United States Schools

By Lois Weis; Michelle Fine | Go to book overview

CAMERON McCARTHY


Chapter Sixteen
Beyond the Poverty of Theory in Race
Relations: Nonsynchrony and Social
Difference in Education

Contemporary curriculum researchers are still very much prone to see racial antagonism as a kind of deposit or disease that is triggered into existence by some deeper flaw of character or of society. In this sense, both mainstream and racial conceptualizations of racial inequality can be described as "essentialist" and "reductionist," in that they effectively eliminate the "noise" of multidimensionality, historical variability, and subjectivity from their explanations of educational differences. 1 Let me clarify what I mean by essentialism and reductionism. By essentialism I refer to the tendency in current liberal and neo-Marxist writing on race and gender to treat social groups as stable or homogeneous entities. Racial groups such as "Asians," "Hispanics," or "Blacks" are therefore discussed as though members of these groups possessed some "unique" or innate set of characteristics that set them apart from "whites." Feminist theorists such as Theresa DeLauretis have critiqued dominant tendencies in mainstream research to define gender differences in terms of transcendental essences. She maintains that differences in the political and cultural behavior of women and men are determined by social and historical contingencies and not some essentialist checklist of innate, biological or primordial characteristics. 2 As I will show later in my essay, essentialism significantly inhibits a dynamic understanding of race relations and race-based politics in education and society. Reductionist strategies, on the other hand, tend to locate the "source" of racial differences in schooling in

-325-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Beyond Silenced Voices: Class, Race, and Gender in United States Schools
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 437

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.