Rethinking Jewish Faith: The Child of a Survivor Responds

By Steven L. Jacobs | Go to book overview

Our freedom to survive in this post-Shoah world as a particularlistic community, always willing to learn from our past but no longer afraid to move beyond it in thought and action, now depends upon our examination of the Shoah with all of its implications with eyes, hearts, minds, and souls open wide. For us Jews at the end of the twentieth century, it is the one phenomenon we cannot ignore if we are to fully prepare ourselves to meet and greet the twenty-first century.

Having now addressed both God and covenant-chosenness, we now turn to the concept of prayer, the way in which we humans, especially we Jews, have long sought to communicate with the God whom we always believed communicated with us.


Notes
1.
See Irving Greenberg, "Voluntary Covenant", in Steven L. Jacobs, Contemporary Jewish Religious Responses to the Shoah ( Lanham, Md.: University Press of America, 1993), pages 77-105.
2.
Following the fact that, during the darkest days of the Shoah, representatives of the organized worldwide Jewish community met with Nazi representatives in an ultimately fruitless effort to save Jewish life, but they met nonetheless.
3.
I have long envisioned, for example, the creation of an Institute for Interreligious Understanding and Dialogue, associated with a college or university, that, through conferences and scholarly publications, would explore the difficulties and inherent tensions in all such dialogues.
4.
Raul Hilberg magisterial three-volume The Destruction of the Jews, revised and definitive edition ( New York: Holmes and Meier, 1985) summarizes this pattern succinctly as the movement from "You have no right live among us as Jews" to "You have no right to live among us" to "You have no right to live."

-27-

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