Rethinking Jewish Faith: The Child of a Survivor Responds

By Steven L. Jacobs | Go to book overview

3
The Crises of Prayer
Prayer, too, like so much else, now stands in need of rethinking in light of Shoah. Appeals to God to correct present situations or to dramatically alter future possibilities have now proven themselves of no avail. To now expect God to respond on a less frightful level to less critical pleas is, to my way of thinking, theological absurdity, having realized no response from On High to words spoken in earnestness and fervor during the long dark night of Nazism's all-too-successful reign of terror. Unless, of course, we are prepared to accept a God able to deal with only the inconsequential rather than the consequential, equally a theological absurdity. Prayer will now have to become an internal plea, given voice and thought, for recognition that
1. . the universe does manifest certain harmonies if we are but receptive to them;
2. . creation allows us more possibilities for human growth than does destruction;
3. .aesthetic appreciation of our world enhances our pleasure at being part of it;
4. .the prayerfully poetic words of our predecessors, both Jewish and Christian, contained with the siddurim (sabbath and festival prayer books) and machzorim (High Holy Day prayer books) of both religious traditions, now reinterpreted since the Shoah, likewise increase the shared yearnings of all humankind for peace and survival;
5. .the disciplined gatherings of like-minded groups in celebration and in sorrow can help energize us to confront the challenges of our own day and learn from each other;
6. . last and perhaps most important, we need not suspend our intellect nor deny historical realities, especially those of the Shoah, when we engage in what we will continue to call prayer.

We will take each in turn.

-29-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rethinking Jewish Faith: The Child of a Survivor Responds
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 151

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.