We Have No Leaders: African Americans in the Post-Civil Rights Era

By Robert C. Smith; Ronald W. Walters | Go to book overview

Appendix
A Comparison of Democratic Party Platform Language
on Full Employment, 1944-1992
1944

To speed victory, establish and maintain peace, guarantee full employment and provide prosperity—this is our platform.

1948

To serve the interests of all and not the few . . . to achieve security, full production and full employment—this is our platform.

1952

The Democratic administration prudently passed the Employment Act of 1946 declaring it to be national policy never again to permit large‐ scale unemployment to stalk the land. We will assure the transition from defense production to peace-time production without the ravages of unemployment. We pledge ourselves at all times to the maintenance of maximum production and purchasing power in the American economy.

1954

We repudiate the Republican stunting of economic growth, and we reassert the principles of the Full Employment Act.

1960

The Democratic party reaffirms its support of full employment as a permanent objective of national policy. For nearly thirty months the rate of unemployment has been between 5 and 7.5 percent of the labor force. A pool of three to four million citizens, able and willing to work but unable to find jobs, has been written off by the Republican administration as a "normal" readjustment of the economic system. The policies of a Democratic administration to restore economic growth will reduce current unemployment to a minimum. Thereafter, if recessionary trends appear, we will act promptly with countermeasures such as public works or temporary tax cuts. We will not stand idly by and permit recessions to run their course as the Republican administration has done.

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