Work and Lifecourse in Japan

By Samuel Coleman; Theodore F. Cook Jr. et al. | Go to book overview
(Carolina Population Center) and Eleanor Westney ( Yale University Department of Sociology) for their helpful comments.
1.
Japanese men averaged 24 minutes of weekly time spent in household tasks and errands as opposed to an overall average of 83 minutes for men in each of the other countries investigated. As a ratio of women's housework, this represents one hour for every 10.8 hours of women's housework time, in contrast with ratios ranging from 2.3 to 5.4 for the other countries studied (calculated using figures in Keizaikikaku-chō 1973:60). Data for the ten Euro-American countries in the study -- the United States, West Germany, France, Belgium, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, Poland, Bulgaria, and the Soviet Union -- were gathered in 1965-1966; Japanese data were gathered in 1972.
2.
Japanese men averaged 7.2 hours of work daily for a seven-day week, a figure matched by Hungary but well above the mean of 6.4 for the average of all other countries in the study.
3.
The total fertility rate (an estimate of how many children each woman bears in her lifetime based on the current reproductive record of all women of child-bearing age) for 1947 was 4.5 children; by 1970, it had sunk to 2. 1.
4.
About 90 percent of newlywed contraceptors in the questionnaire sample were relying on condoms alone or with rhythm, a result corroborated by surveys of newlyweds in which between 72 and 87 percent reported using condoms ( Ogino 1976:35; Kon 1973:114).
5.
Japanese infertility specialists commonly assumed that 10 percent of all couples are infecund (see, for example, Iizuka et al. 1972:19), although fewer than 10 percent of American couples within some subgroups are childless (U.S. Bureau of the Census 1973:138. Much smaller percentages of infertile couples are known; among the Hutterites, a highly fertile religious community, only 2.4 percent of couples married over 20 years are childless; Tietze 1957).
6.
In 1962 the absolute numbers of adoptions of minors in Japan and the United Kingdom were nearly identical, but the number of adoptions of minors in Japan in the 1960's actually decreased, despite an increase in the number of married couples, in contrast to an increase of over 70 percent in the United Kingdom in the same period ( Yuzawa 1973:134-135).
7.
See, for example, Murayama 1976; in a study of 210 husbands of women delivering in a Niigata Prefecture hospital, only 26.2 percent were present at the hospital when their children were born, almost all of the rest being either at work or home.

References
Akamatsu Tadashi
1969 "Women Workers and Retirement after Marriage". Japan Labor Bulletin 8 (5, May): 6-8.

-209-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Work and Lifecourse in Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.