Art and the Absolute: A Study of Hegel's Aesthetics

By William Desmond | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
In recent decades Jack Kaminsky Hegel on Art ( Albany: SUNY Press, 1962) is one of the few book-length studies in English of Hegel's aesthetics -- one seriously flawed by its divorce of art from Hegel's system as a whole. It would appear that we have to go as far back as J.S. Kedney's Hegel Aesthetics ( Chicago: Griggs and Co., 1892) for a previous book-length exposition. For work outside of the Anglo-American context, see the comprehensive Bibliographie zur Ästhetik Hegels 1830-1965 compiled by W. Henckmann , in Hegel-Studien, 5, 1969. See also the bibliography compiled by Joseph Flay in Art and Logic in Hegel Philosophy, W. E. Steinkraus and K. Schmitz (eds.), ( New Jersey: Humanities Press, 1980), pp. 239-249. Stephen Bunjay Beauty and Truth: A Study of Hegel's Aesthetics ( Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1984) appeared while the present work was sufficiently advanced in press as to make it impossible for me to adequately assess its contribution. I anticipate publishing a review of Bunjay's book in a future volume of the Journal of the History of Philosophy.
2.
See, for instance, John Toews, Hegelianism: The Path Towards Dialectical Humanism, 1805-1841 ( New York: Cambridge University Press, 1980), p. 86, where he says: "The inner consolidation of Hegelianism into an academic school centered in Berlin was intimately connected to the external consolidation of the ties among Hegelianism, the Prussian Kultusministerium, and the Berlin literary and cultural elites . . . Moreover, the influence of Hegelianism in Berlin was not confined to the university. The sympathy and support of patrons of literature and the arts like the Varnhagens, the Veits, and the Mendelssohns and influential cultural critics and journalists like Forster and Moritz Saphir ( 1795-1858) made Hegelianism an extremely

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Art and the Absolute: A Study of Hegel's Aesthetics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One - Art, Imitation and Creation 1
  • Chapter Two - Art, Philosophy and Concreteness 15
  • Chapter Three - Art, Religion and Absoluteness 35
  • Chapter Four - Art, History, and the Question of an End 57
  • Chapter Five - Dialectic, Deconstruction and Art's Wholeness 77
  • Chapter Six - Beauty and the Aesthetic Dilemma of Modernity 103
  • Notes 167
  • Bibliography 205
  • Index 217
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