When the Marching Stopped: The Politics of Civil Rights Regulatory Agencies

By Hanes Walton Jr. | Go to book overview

PREFACE

This is the first comprehensive and systematic study of the sundry civil rights regulatory agencies in the various cabinet departments created under Titles VI and VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Any review of the literature on these regulatory agencies that deal essentially with human rights and their violations in this democratic society will reveal several books on the Fair Employment Practice Commission (FEPC), the first experiment in this area, one on state civil rights agencies, one on the Commission on Civil Rights and several studies on the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). 1 But as for Title VI Compliance, with the exception of some reports by the Civil Rights Commission, there are but two books in this area. 2 In brief, there is a significant void in the literature.

My interest in this subject grew out of a year as a visiting scholar in the office of Civil Rights Compliance in the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration (LEAA). In January 1975, the staff director of the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA), Dr. Don M. Blandin, informed me that I had been selected as an NASPAA Fellow and could spend a year interning in Washington, D.C., with a federal agency that had interest in my credentials and training. In February, Nan Shute of LEAA called and indicated her interest in having me work with the agency as special assistant to the director of the Office of Civil Rights Compliance, attorney Herbert Rice. The internship was to last for a full year— August 1, 1975, to July 31, 1976.

Director Rice, unlike some agency heads, involved me in every aspect of the functions of the office. I traveled with different divisions, did complaint investigations and resolutions, was project monitor for two of the office's large

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