Changing Our Minds: Feminist Transformations of Knowledge

By Susan Hardy Aiken; Karen Anderson et al. | Go to book overview

Contributors

LESLIE A. FLEMMING, Associate Professor of Oriental Studies, University of Arizona, is author of Another Lonely Voice: The Urdu Short Stories of Saadat Hasan Manto ( 1979). She was a Fulbright Fellow to India in 1982. She is currently doing research on interactions between Indian women and American missionaries in North India.

JERROLD E. HOGLE, Associate Professor of English, University of Arizona, was a member of the Steering Committee for the curriculum integration project. He also serves as one of the available consultants for the Southwest Institute for Research on Women. His scholarly work includes the forthcoming Shelley's Process: Radical Transference and the Development of his Major Works, and numerous essays and reviews on literary theory, Romantic Poetry, and English novels of the EIGHTEENTH AND NINETEENTH CENTURIES.

GARY F. JENSEN, Professor of Sociology, University of Arizona, is a noted scholar in the field of juvenile delinquency. In addition to numerous articles and book chapters, Jensen is co-author with Dean Rojek of Delinquency: A Sociological View, and an accompanying book of readings. He is currently finishing a research monograph on gender differences in the experiences of lawyers and clients.

DOUG MCADAM, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Arizona, is the author of Political Process and the Development of Black Insurgency, 1930- 1970. His research on social movements, gerontology, and privacy appears in numerous books and journals. A Guggenheim Fellowship in 1984 furthered his latest research project, a longitudinal study of activists. McAdam will highlight the gender differences in the consequences of civil rights participation in his forthcoming book, Freedom Summer: The Idealists Revisited.

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