The History of That Ingenious Gentleman, Don Quijote de la Mancha

By Miguel De Cervantes Saavedra; Burton Raffel | Go to book overview

Chapter Thirty-Eight

— dealing with Don Quijote's unusual speech about arms
versus learning

Then Don Quijote went on, as follows:

"Just as we began our consideration of student life in terms of poverty, and the various aspects thereof, let us now see if the soldier's life is any richer. And what we will find is that there is no one whose poverty is deeper or more profound than his, for he is dependent on his wretched salary, which he receives either late or not at all, and sometimes must forage and steal for, at high risk both to his life and his conscience. And sometimes Fate leaves him so naked that a tattered jacket serves simultaneously as shirt and dress uniform, and in the middle of winter he's in open country, having to fight off all the rigors of the weather, armed only with the breath out of his mouth — and as I can tell you from experience, coming as it does from an empty place, that breath can't help but emerge cold, though this may seem against the laws of nature. He's looking forward to nightfall, when the bed that's awaiting him will renew and refresh him against all these miseries, and — unless he's guilty of some mistake — he doesn't have to worry about that bed being too narrow, because he can measure out the ground as far as he wants to, in any direction, and roll around as much as he likes, without fear of ruining the sheets. So then there comes, in spite of all this, the day and the hour when he's awarded his degree, the time for battle, and maybe he gets an academic hat of bandages, because he's taken a bullet right in the head, or maybe his arm's been crippled, or his leg. And when that doesn't happen, when merciful Heaven protects him and keeps him alive and healthy, perhaps he'll still be just as poor as he was before, and he'll have to go through battle after battle, one after another, and be the victor in all of them, before things get any better; but we don't see many such miracles. For tell me, gentlemen, if you've thought about it: how many fewer men have profited by war than have died in it? Unquestionably, you can only answer that there is absolutely no comparison, for the dead are utterly uncountable and those who have profited, and are still alive, will never total even as much as a thousand. And it's exactly the opposite with men of learning, for what they earn — without counting what they're given — will always be enough to keep them alive: the soldier must work harder, but he receives much less. You can answer, of course, that it's easier to reward two thousand learned men than thirty thousand soldiers, because they can be given offices which simply have to be awarded to those of their professions, while soldiers can only be rewarded out of the wealth and property of the lord they serve. Yet this impossibility only further strengthens my argument. But even setting this to the side, as a labyrinth through which it is hard to make one's way, let us come back to the superiority of arms as opposed to learning, a subject long in dispute and debated this way and that from each side of the question, and among other arguments that have been put forward, learning insists that, without its help, arms cannot endure, since warfare too has its laws, which must be obeyed, and laws fall under their jurisdiction. To this, arms replies that,

-254-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The History of That Ingenious Gentleman, Don Quijote de la Mancha
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 733

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.