Fashion Spreads: Word and Image in Fashion Photography since 1980

By Paul Jobling | Go to book overview

1
Vogue

You don't look to Vogue to pop the bubble. It is not just there to create desires but to sell, sell, sell them.

Anna Wintour, The Guardian, 1991.


Introduction: Style and Sensibility

Vogue had originally been launched in 1892 in America as a society magazine aimed at all those whose names were recorded on the Social Register. 1 It did not come into its own as a fashion periodical, however, until 1909, when a young tycoon called Thomas Condé Nast took over the running of the title in partnership with its first editor Edna Woolman. 2 A British edition subsequently followed in 1916, and French and Italian versions in 1920 and 1950 respectively. During the period January to June 1996 the inclusive circulation figures for British Vogue were at an all-time high of 193,539 copies, whereas when Nast purchased the American edition, the circulation of the magazine was more modest – approximately 14,000 copies per month. 3 For Nast, however, the issue was not one of aiming to increase Vogue's readership, and during the 1920s and 1930s he deliberately continued to emphasise the magazine's social exclusivity. What was of more importance to him was its aesthetic appearance, and he was fully aware of the ways in which the layout of the contemporary magazine in Europe was being greatly transformed by new developments in typography and photomechanical printing. 4 The impetus of both the Arts and Crafts Movement and Art Nouveau at the end of the nineteenth century had implied that utilitarian objects like magazines could nonetheless be the subject of aesthetic production values, involving the quality of the paper used as much as a commitment to harmony in graphic design. This ideology was manifest in many periodicals published across Europe and America, including The Studio, Jugend, Ver Sacrum and Inland Printer. 5 In turn, the half-tone process, which had been patented by Meisenbach in Germany in 1882 and involved breaking down the image into a matrix of dots by photographing the subject through a screen of diagonal lines, began to be consistently incorporated into the illustrated press by the

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fashion Spreads: Word and Image in Fashion Photography since 1980
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • List of Figures xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes *
  • Part 1 - Back to the Future: Fashion Publishing since 1980 15
  • Introductionto Part 1 17
  • Notes *
  • 1 - Vogue 19
  • Notes *
  • 2 - The Face 35
  • Notes *
  • 3 - Arena 49
  • Notes *
  • Conclusion - To Part 1 59
  • Notes *
  • Part 2 - Written Clothing and Image- Clothing: Roland Barthes' ‘the Fashion System' in Perspective 63
  • Introductionto Part 2 65
  • Notes *
  • 4 - ‘the Fashion System’: a Synopsis 69
  • Notes *
  • 5 - Going beyond ‘the Fashion System’: a Critique 83
  • Notes *
  • Conclusion - To Part 2 101
  • Notes *
  • Part 3 - Bodylines: Identity and Othernessin Fashion Photography since 1980 105
  • Introductionto Part 3 107
  • Notes *
  • 6 - Who's That Girl? Alex and Kate: a Tale of Two Bodies in Contemporary Fashion Photography 111
  • Notes 136
  • 7 - ‘statue Men’: the Phallic Body, Identity and Ambiguity in Fashion Photography 143
  • Notes 180
  • Appendix 1 - Directoryof Fashion Photographers, Stylistsand Magazine Features 1980–1996 189
  • Appendix 2 - Photographersfor British ‘vogue’1980–1995 211
  • Bibliography 215
  • Index 235
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 242

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.