Before Mark Twain: A Sampler of Old, Old Times on the Mississippi

By John Francis McDermott | Go to book overview

DESCRIPTION OF BANVARD'S PANORAMA

JOHN BANVARD

[The following description of views in his panorama Banvard issued after he had added the Missouri River section in order to outdo his closest competitor, John Rowson Smith. Two sections of the pamphlet (as published in London in 1849), describing "The Rivers" and "Life on the Mississippi," have been omitted here because they were lifted without credit from Timothy Flint. In a later English printing some testimonials from Charles Dickens and other noted persons were added to the American endorsements.]

The Panorama.

As the Painting alternately ascends on one representation, and descends the next, it will be necessary for the reader, when ascending, to commence at the end of this description, and follow it back to the beginning.

YELLOW STONE BLUFFS

Of the Missouri-View looking several miles up the river. The Missouri river, although it is called a tributary to the Mississippi, is considered by many to be the main stream, and strictly speaking it is. The upper Mississippi should have been called the Missouri, for it is much shorter, and brings down less water in the main channel than the latter stream.

ASSINNABOIN'S BAR

Dividing the river at the base of a lofty precipice.

THE DOMES

Here we have some of the most unique scenery probably in the world. Large clay bluffs, of different coloured clays, rear their heads towards the heavens, the tops are washed away by the rains into circular forms, so that at a distance they resemble immense domes of some gigantic city.

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