Before Mark Twain: A Sampler of Old, Old Times on the Mississippi

By John Francis McDermott | Go to book overview

TEN DAYS IN NEW ORLEANS, 1826

DONALD MACDONALD

[Donald MacDonald's account of his voyage from New Harmony, Indiana, to New Orleans, March 5-13, 1826, the reader has already seen (pp. 40-47 above). His observations made during ten days at New Orleans (March 14-24) are also from his diary kept on this visit to the United States (Indiana Historical Society Publications, XIV [1942], 345-54).]

The following morning after breakfast I landed and took up my lodging at the Planters Hotel (M'. Elkin) a large house the resort usually of Bachelors. I called and delivered my letter from M'. Owen to M'. [MS blank] who was M'. Rapp's agent & has now become M'. Owen's. He & his partner are druggists. He afterwards invited me to tea at his father in law's D'. Rogers where I dined once & found his wife & daughter amiable women, & himself a very intelligent person. At the Planters' I fell in with M'. Thomas from New York, who introduced me to a variety of gentlemen; some merchants & others planters from the neighbourhood. As the house was crowded I was at first put into a small room where there were three more beds, but upon application to the clerk he removed me to another where I had but one companion who proved to be a very respectable gentleman, a judge from Feliciana, a town in the State, & who once stood candidate for the governorship. We became very friendly, and he gave me a pressing invitation to visit him. I learnt that his wife was a very amiable person, & that he had a fine family & resided in a beautiful country. I likewise met a Philadelphia Friend, and two gentlemen with whom I had crossed the ocean last summer in the Canada. [My fellow travellers on board the Columbia introduced me to their acquaintance.] Thus Every day I had one or more companions to visit the town & neighbourhood with. [It is

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