On Repentance and Almsgiving

By Gus George Christo | Go to book overview

HOMILY 3

CONCERNING ALMSGIVING
AND THE TEN VIRGINS

1

I WONDER, do you remember at what point our last homily began, or where it ended; or from what supposition the words of the previous homily commenced and at what conclusion they arrived? I think you have forgotten, but I remember. I neither scold you nor condemn you for forgetting this. Every one of you has a wife. She totally devotes herself to her children and she takes care of all the household's domestic affairs. Others occupy themselves with military affairs; others are craftsmen. Each one of you engages in a different service. However, I always engage myself in these liturgical affairs. I attend to these and employ myself in them. Therefore, no one should blame you—I do not blame you for forgetting where we left off. Rather, I should praise you for your earnestness, because you do not abandon me any Sunday.

(2) You abandon everything and present yourselves in Church. This is a great laudation for our city: it possesses an earnest and attentive population, and not noise, suburbs, and spacious houses covered with streams of gold. For we recognize the nobility of a tree not from its leaves, but from its fruits. This is the very reason we surpass the irrational animals : we possess reason and we share in and love the word. For a man who does not love the Logos is much more illogical than the brutes. He does not know why he is honored and from what source his honor comes. The prophet was

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