On Repentance and Almsgiving

By Gus George Christo | Go to book overview

HOMILY 6

ON FASTING: PREACHED DURING THE SIXTH
WEEK OF THE HOLY FORTY-DAY FAST

1

DOW DELIGHTFUL the waves of this spiritual sea are to us 1. and how much more delightful than those on the high sea! The latter arise by the disorder of the winds, the former by the desire of the audience. The waves of the high sea, when they peak, cause agony to the helmsman, but the waves of the spiritual sea inspire great courage in the speaker. The former reveal positively that the sea is agitated, but the latter are signs of a happy soul. Although the former dash against the rocks and emit an unintelligible roar, the latter beat against the word of the teaching and send forth a gentle voice. Likewise, when the blasts of the zephyr fall upon the crops and make the heads of the ears of grain bow and rise, they imitate the waves of the sea going over dry land. However, these spiritual waves are more delightful even than those sensible waves of the crops, since the grace of the Holy Spirit, not the blasts of the zephyr, elevated your souls and made them ardent. And that fire spoken of by Christ—"I came to cast fire upon the earth and how I wish it were already kindled" 2.—I see has been set securely and burns in your souls. Therefore, since the fear of Christ has ignited so many torches for us, bring this fear to our present assembly and let us drip the oil of teaching so the light may endure with more lasting strength for us.

____________________
1.
The spiritual sea refers to fasting and the course of the Great Fast of Holy and Great Lent.
2.
Lk 12.49.

-69-

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