Out of Work: Unemployment and Government in Twentieth-Century America

By Richard Vedder; Lowell Gallaway | Go to book overview

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Lowell E. Gallaway is research fellow at the Independent Institute and distinguished professor of economics, Ohio University. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Illinois. He has been staff economist, Joint Economic Committee of the Congress of the U.S.; chief, Analytic Studies Section, Social Security Administration; and has taught at the Colorado State University, Lund University, University of Minnesota, University of New South Wales, University of North Carolina, University of Pennsylvania and University of Texas. He is the author of The Retirement Decision, Interindustry Labor Mobility in the United States, Geographic Labor Mobility in the United States, Manpower Economics, Poverty in America, The Role of Wealth in American Society (with R. Vedder), and The Effect of Immigration on Unemployment and Economic Growth in the United States (with S. Moore and R. Vedder). His articles have appeared in such journals as American Economic Review, American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Business History Review, Economy and History, Explorations in Economic History, Growth and Change, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Journal of Business, Journal of Economic History, Journal of Human Resources, Journal of Political Economy, Labor History, National Tax Journal, Public Choice, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Review of Economics and Statistics, Southern Economic Review, Swedish Journal of Economics and Social Security Bulletin.

Richard K. Vedder is research fellow at the Independent Institute and distinguished professor of economics and faculty associate, Contemporary History Institute, Ohio University. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Illinois. He has taught at the University of Colorado, Claremont Men's College, and MARA Institute of Technology. He is the author of The American Economy in Historical Perspective and Poverty, Income Distribution, the Family and Public Policy (with L. Gallaway), and co-editor of Essays in Nineteenth Century Economic History, Essays in the Economy of the Old Northwest, and Variations in Business and Economic History. A contributor to numerous scholarly volumes, his articles and reviews have appeared in such journals as Agricultural History, Business History Review, Canadian Journal of Economics, Economic Inquiry, Economy and History, Explorations in Economic History, Growth and Change, Journal of Economic History, South African Journal of Economics, Public Choice, and Research in Economic History.

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Out of Work: Unemployment and Government in Twentieth-Century America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Out of Work *
  • About the Authors *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword viii
  • Preface xii
  • 1 - The Unemployment Century 1
  • 2 - Unemployment in Theory 13
  • 3 - The Neoclassical/Austrian Approach: an Overview 31
  • 4 - The Gilded Age 53
  • 5 - From New Era to New Deal 74
  • 6 - The Banking Crisis and the Labor Market 112
  • 7 - The New Deal 128
  • 8 - The Impossible Dream Come True 150
  • 9 - The Gentle Time 176
  • 10 - The Camelot Years 194
  • 11 - Pride Goeth before a Fall 209
  • 12 - The Winds of Change 226
  • 13 - The Natural Rate of Unemployment 246
  • 14 - Who Bears the Burden of Unemployment? 268
  • 15 - Unemployment and the State 288
  • Appendix 298
  • Bibliography 308
  • Index 329
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