Human Rights and Comparative Foreign Policy

By David P. Forsythe | Go to book overview

Notes
1
Jack Donnelly, “Post-Cold War Reflections on the Study of International Human Rights,” Ethics and International Affairs 8 (1994), 97–118. See also Donnelly's very good review of the literature on human rights and foreign policy in his International Human Rights (Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1998, 2nd edn.), 195–198.
2
Peter R. Baehr, The Role of Human Rights in Foreign Policy (London: Macmillan, 1994).
3
David Gillies, Between Principle and Practice: Human Rights in North–South Relations (Montreal: McGill-Queens University Press, 1996).
4
See further John G. Stoessinger, Nations in Darkness/Nations at Dawn (New York: McGraw Hill, 1994, 6th edn.).
5
See further especially Margaret E. Keck and Kathryn Sikkink, Activists beyond Borders: Advocacy Networks in International Politics (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1998).
6
David P. Forsythe, American Exceptionalism and Global Human Rights (Lincoln: University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 1999, Distinguished Professor Lecture).
7
For an optimistic account see Debora L. Spar, “The Spotlight and the Bottom Line,” Foreign Affairs 77/2 (March/April 1998), 7–12.
8
Margaret Hermann and Joe. D. Hagan, “International Decision Making: Leadership Matters,” Foreign Policy no. 110 (Spring 1998), 124–137.
9
David P. Forsythe, “The United Nations, Human Rights, and Development,” Human Rights Quarterly 19/2 (May 1997), 334–349.
10
Alain Noel and Jean-Marc Therien, “From Domestic to International Justice: The Welfare State and Foreign Aid,” International Organization 49/3 (Summer 1995), 523– 553.
11
David P. Forsythe, “The UN and Human Rights at Fifty: An Incremental but Incomplete Revolution,” Global Governance 1/3 (September–December 1995), 297–318.

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Human Rights and Comparative Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Tables and Figures vii
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 18
  • Part I - Some Liberal Democracies of the Oecd 19
  • 2 - Us Foreign Policy and Human Rights: the Price of Principles after the Cold War 21
  • Notes *
  • 3 - Trials and Errors: the Netherlands and Human Rights 49
  • Notes *
  • 4 - British Foreign Policy and Human Rights: from Low to High Politics 87
  • Notes *
  • 5 - Japan's Foreign Policy towards Human Rights: Uncertain Changes 115
  • Notes *
  • Part II - Some Other States 147
  • 6 - Russian Foreign Policy and Human Rights: Conflicted Culture and Uncertain Policy 149
  • Notes *
  • 7 - India's Human Rights Diplomacy: Crisis and Transformation 178
  • Notes 204
  • 8 - Iran and Human Rights 206
  • Notes *
  • 9 - Human Rights and Foreign Policy in Central Europe: Hungary, the Czech Republic, and Poland 224
  • Notes 245
  • 10 - Human Rights and Foreign Policy in Post-Apartheid South Africa 250
  • Notes *
  • 11 - Latin American Foreign Policies and Human Rights 276
  • Notes 307
  • 12 - An Overview 310
  • Notes *
  • Postscript: the Kosovo Crisis 335
  • Contributors 342
  • Index 343
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