Honing the Keys to the City: Refining the United States Marine Corps Reconnaissance Force for Urban Ground Combat Operations

By Russell W. Glenn; Jamison Jo Medby et al. | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The penalty for undertaking urban combat operations without first performing reconnaissance has historically proven very costly on more than one occasion. Yet reconnaissance is considerably more difficult in villages, towns, and cities than in open terrain. The many buildings and other structures can provide cover and concealment for large numbers of a foe's vehicles, personnel, and supplies. Unlike when these assets are hidden in more open ground under foliage or camouflage nets, overhead systems often cannot penetrate the concealment in urban areas. The acquisition of trustworthy and timely combat intelligence must therefore rely on units trained and equipped to conduct ground combat reconnaissance. Urban areas also present special challenges to these men. Undetected movement is difficult in an environment dense with noncombatants and, possibly, enemy. Noise ricochets off hard surfaces so that even a minor slip can compromise a unit's location. Structures and infrastructure block or otherwise disrupt communications. The sum of challenges is considerably greater than the doctrinal, training, and equipment solutions immediately at hand. The purpose of this study is to narrow that unfortunate gap.

This research was sponsored by the U.S. Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory (MCWL) and was conducted in the International Security and Defense Policy Center of RAND's National Defense Research Institute (NDRI). NDRI is a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the Secretary of Defense and Joint Staff. This report will be of interest to individuals in the governmental and commercial sector whose responsibilities include doctrine, policy design, funding, planning, preparation, or the development of tech-

-iii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Honing the Keys to the City: Refining the United States Marine Corps Reconnaissance Force for Urban Ground Combat Operations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables ix
  • Summary xi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Glossary xix
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Shortfalls in USMC Urban Ground Combat Reconnaissance 11
  • Chapte Three - Urban Ground Combat Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures Considerationsm 39
  • Chapter Four - Conclusion 91
  • Appendix - USMC Urban Ground Reconnaissance Shortfalls 93
  • Bibliography 99
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 108

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.