Honing the Keys to the City: Refining the United States Marine Corps Reconnaissance Force for Urban Ground Combat Operations

By Russell W. Glenn; Jamison Jo Medby et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter Four
CONCLUSION

As is more often than not the case with military capabilities, a commander confronting an urban combat operation will likely find himself with more reconnaissance tasks than assets to carry them out. Given that this commander has melded an organization capable of making the most of all elements of his intelligence collection system, he should be able to somewhat reduce the number of tasks assigned to ground reconnaissance units. Such wise use of the intelligence system also reduces the risk to which Marines in those units are exposed because reconnaissance obtained via unmanned or longerdistance means precludes the need to put individuals unnecessarily in harm's way. Ultimately, however, urban missions undertaken within the next five years will surely demand Marine boots on urban turf, for no other capability can see where they can see or go where they can go. Equally and surely, there will be more in the way of things to see and places to go than there are reconnaissance Marines to undertake the tasks.

The extent of these future shortfalls will in considerable part be a function of decisions made now. It is fortunate that many decisions can have immediate and significant effect. The role of STA teams, the nature of SOTG training, and the degree of flexibility designed into reconnaissance TTP are among those that can be altered in a matter of months after the provision of guidance so directing. Others, such as developing innovative urban infiltration techniques and testing them during exercises, experiments, and actual operations, will take more time, but developing an initial set of options for consideration should not be overly time consuming. A third class of decisions may extend beyond the grasp of immediate action. If

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Honing the Keys to the City: Refining the United States Marine Corps Reconnaissance Force for Urban Ground Combat Operations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables ix
  • Summary xi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Glossary xix
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Shortfalls in USMC Urban Ground Combat Reconnaissance 11
  • Chapte Three - Urban Ground Combat Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures Considerationsm 39
  • Chapter Four - Conclusion 91
  • Appendix - USMC Urban Ground Reconnaissance Shortfalls 93
  • Bibliography 99
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