Mathematical Proficiency for All Students: Toward a Strategic Research and Development Program in Mathematics Education

By Deborah Loewenberg Ball | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The RAND Mathematics Study Panel and its members are grateful to the many groups and individuals who played a role in shaping this report.

First, the panel is indebted to the independent peer reviewers who critiqued our initial draft: Jere Brophy, Michigan University; Douglas Carnine, University of Oregon, together with R. James Milgram, Stanford University; Jere Confrey, University of Texas at Austin; Cindy Chapman, Inez Elementary School, New Mexico; Paul Cobb, Peabody College, Vanderbilt University; Sue Eddins, Illinois Mathematics Science Academy; Daniel Goroff, Harvard University; Glenda Lappan, Michigan State University; Judith Sowder, San Diego State University; Alan Schoenfeld, University of California Berkeley; and David G. Wright, Brigham Young University. Their reviews contributed significantly to reshaping the original draft.

The panel also thanks the various professional associations and the persons within them who, by individual or group response, provided valuable commentary on the RAND Mathematics Study Panel's initial draft that was posted on the project Web site (www.rand.org/multi/achievementforall/math/). Individual practitioners and scholars, too numerous to list by name, independently sent us helpful comments and suggestions on the draft report; we thank each and every one of them for taking the time to review and offer thoughtful comments on the report's initial draft.

At RAND, we have many people we wish to thank. Gina Schuyler Ikemoto, Elaine Newton, Kathryn Markham, and Donna Boykin provided guidance and support that facilitated our work; Nancy DelFavero, editor of the final report, dedicated numerous hours to carefully reading the text and making improvements in the prose. Tom Glennan devoted endless time to this project, offering invaluable reactions, advice, and skilled insight, as well as careful writing. Others also played crucial roles: Fritz Mosher contributed in numerous essential ways to the panel's deliberations and to the construction of the report itself. Mark Hoover of the University of Michigan read critically, searched out refer-

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