Eastern Spirituality in America: Selected Writings

By Robert S. Ellwood | Go to book overview

V

THEOSOPHY

We have already, in the introductory chapter of this book, glanced at the founding and basic outlook of the Theosophical Society. The role of this extraordinary movement in disseminating Eastern ideas in America should not be underestimated. Its lectures, periodicals, and gifts of books to public libraries have reached not only major cities, but numerous American small towns as well, to leave behind a general awareness of such concepts as karma and the spiritual evolution of the universe. Sometimes an ongoing group was the reward of Theosophical promotional efforts as well. For example, according to the Theosophic Messenger of January 1900, there were some seventy-one branches of the society in America. They were not restricted to such expected haunts of the occult as Boston, New York, and Los Angeles, but were also found in such places as Council Bluffs (Iowa), Honolulu, Sheridan (Wyoming), and Pierre (South Dakota). The White Lotus Lodge in Pierre reported "very interesting and instructive meetings every Saturday." The group had gone through seven theosophical manuals and was engaged in discussion of karma as the century turned.

So it was that, through Theosophy, Eastern ideas trickled down into the American heartland. For part of the legacy of Theosophy was a sense that the spiritual East was important. It was not necessarily more important than Western religion, rightly understood in light of its esoteric symbolism. But the East was equally significant, for both East and West were veils under which ancient wisdom was concealed, yet through which the wise could nonetheless discern its true contours.

-215-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Eastern Spirituality in America: Selected Writings
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Eastern Spirituality in America - Selected Writings *
  • Contents v
  • Preface 1
  • General Introduction 4
  • I - Introduction 5
  • II - Hinduism 45
  • Hindu Selections *
  • III - Buddhism 114
  • Buddhist Selections *
  • IV - Taoism 195
  • Taoist Selection *
  • V - Theosophy 215
  • Theosophy Selection *
  • Bibliography of General Works on Eastern Spirituality in America 235
  • Index to Introduction 237
  • Index to Texts 240
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 245

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.