The Global Threat of New and Reemerging Infectious Diseases: Reconciling U.S. National Security and Public Health Policy

By Jennifer Brower; Peter Chalk | Go to book overview

Chapter One
DISEASE AND HUMAN SECURITY

THE CHANGING NATURE OF SECURITY IN THE POST–
COLD WAR ERA

With the collapse of the Soviet bloc in Eastern Europe in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it appeared that the world system could be on the threshold of an era of unprecedented peace and stability. Politicians, diplomats, and academics alike began to forecast the imminent establishment of a new world order, increasingly managed by an integrated international system based on the principles of liberal sdemocracy and the free market.1 As this new world order emerged, so it was assumed that serious threats to international stability and security would decline commensurately.

However, the initial euphoria that was evoked by the end of the Cold War has now been replaced by a growing sense of unease that nontraditional challenges—so-called “gray area phenomena”2—may soon come to assume greater prominence. Such concern has been stimulated by the remarkable fluidity that now characterizes international politics, an environment in which it is no longer apparent

____________________
1
For a detailed survey of these proposed changes, see the International Monetary Fund, The World Economic Outlook, Washington D.C., 1991, especially pp. 26–27.
2
For a detailed account of the notion of gray area phenomena, see Peter Chalk, NonMilitary Security and Global Order: The Impact of Violence, Chaos and Disorder on International Security, London: Macmillan, 2000, Chapter One. See also Jim HoldenRhodes and Peter Lupsha, “Gray Area Phenomena: New Threats and Policy Dilemmas,” Criminal Justice International, Vol. 9, No. 1, 1993, pp. 11–17, and their “Horsemen of the Apocalypse: Gray Area Phenomena and the New World Disorder,” Low Intensity Conflict and Law Enforcement, Vol. 2, No. 2, 1993, pp. 212–226.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Global Threat of New and Reemerging Infectious Diseases: Reconciling U.S. National Security and Public Health Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 146

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.