Beyond the Nuclear Shadow: A Phased Approach for Improving Nuclear Safety and U.S.-Russian Relations

By David E. Mosher; Lowell H. Schwartz et al. | Go to book overview

ILLUSTRATIVE PRESIDENTIAL DIRECTIVE ON
NUCLEAR SAFETY

Background
The reactions of both the United States and Russia to the attacks of September 11, 2002, have solidified the evolutionary changes that have been occurring since the end of the Cold War. For the first time since the Second World War, the United States and Russia find themselves cooperating, in this case in the war on terrorism. Despite these seismic shifts, however, substantial elements of the strategic nuclear forces of both nations remain on alert. This posture endangers both nations because of the possibility it provides for an unauthorized launch by a terrorist or an accidental launch based on mistaken information. These grave dangers are exacerbated by Russia's economic difficulties and by the large number of U.S. counterforce strategic nuclear weapons that are ready to strike within minutes.In light of these concerns, the President has decided to make two objectives—reducing nuclear danger and improving nuclear safety—a priority of his administration. The United States urgently needs to work with Russia to improve the nuclear safety of both nations.
Goals
Relevant Federal agencies are directed to explore technical, operational, policy, and diplomatic measures to meet the following three goals. Moreover, since the promotion of nuclear safety will involve many dimensions, all three should be pursued as part of a comprehensive strategy.
1. Ensure that both the United States and Russia have reliable, highquality early-warning and attack-detection capabilities.
2. Extend the time that civilian and military officials have to make decisions involving the possible use of nuclear weapons both in peacetime and during crises.

-144-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Beyond the Nuclear Shadow: A Phased Approach for Improving Nuclear Safety and U.S.-Russian Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 153

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.