The Global War on Terrorism: An Early Look at Implications for the Army

By Bruce Nardulli | Go to book overview

SUMMARY
Within days of the attacks on the Pentagon and World Trade Center, the President made the war on terrorism the nation's top priority. It was immediately clear that this shift in priorities would have sweeping implications for the United States Army. Much less clear was their specific nature. A group of Arroyo Center researchers engaged in a series of structured intellectual explorations to determine what the implications of this new global war or terrorism would be for the Army. Those sessions were augmented by other relevant research in the Arroyo Center. This briefing presents the results of their efforts. Researchers addressed two primary questions: what demands would the war on terrorism place on the Army and what responses might it consider? They concluded the following:
Repetitive deployments will continue—the Army needs to manage people accordingly.
More than ever, the Army needs a range of force capabilities—special operations to conventional forces for major wars.
Leveraging the transformation for the war on terrorism means more capable yet mobile light forces that can be easily tailored and special operations forces (SOF)-conventional hybrids.
The Army needs to address the issue of scarce specialty skills that are in high demand to meet competing demands from the war on terrorism and homeland security.
The Army has a large stake in any revised global basing arrangement, and the global war on terrorism adds another essential dimension to the basing issue.

More Deployments

The Army already has long-term commitments in such places as Bosnia, Kosovo, and the Sinai, and in all likelihood these will continue. It is in the U.S. interest to ensure that these areas remain stable. The Army is also currently carrying out combat operations against the remnants of al Qaeda and the Taliban in Afghanistan, employing about 6,000 soldiers in the process. Indications are that operations will continue there for some time. In addition, the war with Iraq and the subsequent occupation of the country represents a sizable commitment of ground forces there, likely for an extended duration.

-vii-

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The Global War on Terrorism: An Early Look at Implications for the Army
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Summary vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Glossary xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Potential Demands on the Army 7
  • Possible Army Responses 20
  • Expanding the Army's Counterterrorism Capabilities 44
  • Conclusions 52
  • Bibliography 53
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