The Archaeology Coursebook: An Introduction to Study Skills, Topics and Methods

By Jim Grant; Sam Gorin et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 14

Where to Next?

Studying Archaeology in the UK

BELOW UNIVERSITY LEVEL

There are plenty of opportunities to study archaeology although the range of qualifications is relatively small. To get further information on any of them either contact your local institution or the Council for British Archaeology (CBA) Education service.

http://www.britarch.ac.uk/educate/ed1.html

Short courses are offered by Colleges of Further Education (FE) and the Workers Educational Association (WEA). Typically these will be 2 hours a week for ten weeks and are generally aimed at adults. Increasingly, colleges will offer an Open College Network (OCN) certificate for these courses.

Day schools or conferences are offered by university departments, FE colleges, local and national archaeological organisations and museums. Many of these involve lectures at university level although some are practically based. The two key sources on these are Current Archaeology (CA) and British Archaeology (BA) magazines.

Field schools, or training digs, are offered by universities and some local organisations in the summer. Details are advertised in CA and BA magazines.


GCSE Archaeology

This is offered by AQA.

www.aqa.org.uk/

Students study archaeological methods and one period of British archaeology from prehistory to post-medieval. There is an exam on each section which follows a standard format. Paper 1 involves interpretation of a map and aerial photograph followed by a series of short questions on a range of methods. Paper 2 has a choice of several illustrations of sites or artefacts, each with a number of short questions. There is also a short piece of coursework. GCSE is largely offered by FE colleges and a few schools.


AS and A Level Archaeology

These are also offered by AQA. The AS can be taken separately or as the first stage of an A Level. Each exam is broken down into three sections or modules. Five of these sections are examinations which each last between one and one and a half hours.

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The Archaeology Coursebook: An Introduction to Study Skills, Topics and Methods
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Brief Contents v
  • Contents vii
  • Figures xix
  • Index of Skills xxii
  • Acknowledgements xxiii
  • Illustration Acknowledgements xxiv
  • Introduction xxv
  • Part One - Understanding Archaeological Resources 1
  • Chapter 1 3
  • Chapter 2 25
  • Chapter 3 58
  • Chapter 4 80
  • Chapter 5 93
  • Chapter 6 105
  • Chapter 7 120
  • Part Two - Studying Themes in Archaeology 135
  • Chapter 8 137
  • Chapter 9 165
  • Chapter 10 196
  • Chapter 11 236
  • Part Three - Examination Success and Beyond 259
  • Chapter 12 261
  • Chapter 13 283
  • Chapter 14 - Where to Next? 296
  • Chapter 15 - Finding the Best Information 301
  • Appendix 305
  • Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations 307
  • Bibliography 315
  • Index 319
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