NOTES

PREFACE
1
Mary Douglas, “Cultural Bias,” in The Active Voice, Boston, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1982, pp. 183-254.
2
Mary Douglas, Natural Symbols, 2nd edn, Barrie and Jenkins, 1973, and with a new introduction, London, Routledge, 1996.
3
E.W. Benson, Cyprian: His Life, His Times, His Work, London, Macmillan, 1897.
4
Michael M. Sage, Cyprian, Cambridge, MA., Philadelphia Patristic Foundation, 1975.
5
Clarke, Letters 1-4.
6
In addition to the introduction to the CCL edition and the extensive bibliography listed therein, see The Tradition of Manuscripts: A Study in the Transmission of St. Cyprian’s Treatises, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1961.
7
Michael A. Fahey, SJ, Cyprian and the Bible: a Study of Third-Century Exegisis, Tübingen, J.C.B. Mohr, 1971.
8
“On Rebaptism: Social Organization in the Third Century Church,” Journal of Early Christian Studies, 1 (1993):367-403.
9
“Confessing the Church: Cyprian on Penance,” Studia Patristica, ed. Edward Yarnold, SJ. and Maurice Wiles, Leuven, Peeters, 2001, 36:338-48.

1

HISTORY OF CYPRIAN’S CONTROVERSIES

1
Pontius, uita Cyp. 5; ep. 43.1.2.
2
The edict itself has not survived. See Clarke, Letters 1:27-8 for evidence that the requirements may have extended to those who were not citizens as well.
3
For the current state of scholarship on the libelli, see Clarke, Letters 1:26-7, 134, n.135. Striking witness to the process of compliance is provided in epp. 8.2.3, 21.3.2. In ep. 43-3, Cyprian made an oblique reference to the five commissioners who supervised the procedures in Carthage.
4
The certificate provided to those who complied with the edict does not mention the renunciation of any other religious loyalty. The central statement in the surviving Egyptian copies of libelli runs, “I have always and without interruption sacrificed to the gods, and now in

-177-

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Cyprian the Bishop
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - History of Cyprian’s Controversies 1
  • 2 - Christians of Carthage Under Persecution 12
  • 3 - Necessity of Repentance 25
  • 4 - Efficacy of the Reconciliation Ritual 51
  • 5 - Indivisibility of the Church 78
  • 6 - Initiation into Unity 100
  • 7 - Purity of the Church 132
  • 8 - Unity of the Episcopate 151
  • 9 - Cyprian’s African Heritage 166
  • Notes 177
  • Bibliography 233
  • Index 235
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