Systematic Theology - Vol. 2

By Charles Hodge | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII.

SATISFACTION OF CHRIST.

§ 1. Statement of the Doctrine.

THE Symbols of the Lutheran and Reformed Churches agree entirely in their statement of this doctrine. In the "Augsburg Confession" 1 it is said, Christus " sua morte pro nostris peccatis satisfecit." In the "Apology for the Augsburg Confession " 2 it is more fully expounded, "Christus, quia sine peccato subiit pœnam peccati, et victima pro nobis factus est, sustulit illud jus legis, ne accuset, ne damnet hos qui credunt in ipsum, quia ipse est propitiatio pro eis, propter quam nunc justi reputantur. Cum autem justi reputentur, lex non potest eos accusare, et damnare, etiamsi re ipsa legi non satisfecerint." "Mors Christi non est solum satisfactio pro culpa, sed etiam pro æterna morte." 3 "In propitiatore hæc duo concurrunt: Primum, oportet exstare verbum Dei, ex quo certo sciamus, quod Deus velit misereri et exaudire invocantes per hunc propitiatorem. Talis exstat de Christo promissio Alterum est in propitiatore, quod merita ipsius proposita sunt, ut, quæ pro aliis satisfacerent, quæ aliis donentur imputatione divina, ut per ea, tanquam propriis meritis justi reputentur, ut si quis amicus pro amico solvit æs alienum, debitor alieno merito tanquam proprio liberatur. Ita Christi merita nobis donantur, ut justi reputentur fiducia meritorum Christi, cum in eum credimus, tanquam propria merita haberemus." 4 In the "Form of Concord " this doctrine is not only presented but elaborately expounded and vindicated. It is said, 5 "Justitia illa, quæ coram Deo fidei, aut credentibus, ex mera gratia imputatur, est obedientia, passio et resurrectio Christi, quibus ille legi nostra causa satisfecit, et peccata nostra expiavit. Cum enim Christus non tantum homo, verum Deus et homo sit, in una persona indivisa, tam non fuit legi subjectus, quam non fuit passioni et morti (ratione suæ personæ), obnoxius, quia

____________________
1
I. iv. 2; Hase, Libri Symbolici, 3d edit. p. 10.
2
III. 58; Ibid. p. 93.
3
VI. 43; Ibid. p. 190.
4
IX. 17, 19; Ibid. p. 226.
5
III. 14, 15; Ibid. p. 684, 685.

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