Alphabet to Email: How Written English Evolved and Where It's Heading

By Naomi S. Baron | Go to book overview

8

Language at a Distance

Imagine yourself at a dinner party. The meal is finished and preparations are underway for the evening’s entertainment. The program will be a concert, sung by a leading diva of the day before an admiring crowd. The guests settle into their seats, and each one is given a device through which to enjoy the music.

The audience isn’t at the concert hall. Nor does it hear the performance carried by television or radio, or even played on a phonograph. Instead, each guest is handed a telephone. For when the telephone was first invented, long before it emerged as a medium for social conversation, it was seriously marketed as a device for broadcasting public lectures and performances.


ELECTRICAL TOYS

Unlike Athena springing well-formed from the head of Zeus, new technologies may take decades to reach maturity. Steam engines were developed for pumping water out of mines, transistors were seen as a panacea for improving hearing aides, and television was initially heralded as an educational medium. Just so, teletechnologies such as the telegraph, the telephone, and email have undergone marked evolution not only in their power to convey messages but in the uses to which we choose to put them.

-216-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Alphabet to Email: How Written English Evolved and Where It's Heading
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Figures x
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Robin Hood’s Retort 1
  • 2 - Legitimating Written English 26
  • 3 - Who Writes, Who Reads, and Why 48
  • 4 - Setting Standards 95
  • 5 - The Rise of English Comp 143
  • 6 - Commas and Canaries 167
  • 7 - What Remington Wrought 197
  • 8 - Language at a Distance 216
  • 9 - Why the Jury’s Still Out on Email 247
  • 10 - Epilogue: Destiny or Choice 260
  • Notes 270
  • Bibliography 285
  • Name Index 305
  • Subject Index 311
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 318

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.