Managing Professional Identities: Knowledge, Performativity and the "New" Professional

By Mike Dent; Stephen Whitehead | Go to book overview

Notes
1
Thanks to my fellow intellectuals Peter Armstrong, Bob Cooper, Valerie Fournier, Simon Lilley and Steve Whitehead for their comments on earlier drafts of this chapter.
2
Though this relation is not necessarily generalizable. In France, the ‘intelligensia’ are not necessarily attached to universities in the same manner.
3
This is a chapter about the UK experience, but it seems that many of the matters I am describing might also be echoed in the HE systems of other states too. See, for example, Mills (1951) for some early comments on the US system.
4
Like the book that you hold in your hand.
5
The logical outcome of this metaphor would be a ranking based entirely on consumption (citation) rather than production (publication).
6
Not, of course, that I would find this a very credible statement when visiting a medical doctor, or dealing with an official in a bank.
7
Mills is an interesting example of a possible ‘organic intellectual’ himself, and much of his writing was clearly intended to reach out to a wider public. It would be interesting to compare this textually.
8
To which one radical response might be to suggest the ‘de-institutionalization’ of knowledge and the destruction of the McUniversity itself (Illich 1973; Parker and Courtney 1998). But that is rather beyond this chapter.

Bibliography

a

Adorno, T. (1974) Minima Moralia: Reflections from Damaged Life, London: New Left Books.

Agger, B. (1990) The Decline of Discourse, New York: Falmer.


b

Bauman, Z. (1987) Legislators and Interpreters, Cambridge: Polity.

Barry, J., Chandler, J. and Clark, H. (2001) ‘Between the Ivory Tower and the Academic Assembly Line’, Journal of Management Studies 38(1):87-101.

Bennett, T. (1998) Culture: A Reformer’s Science, London: Sage.

Bloom, A. (1987) The Closing of the American Mind, New York: Simon and Schuster.

Boggs, C. (2000) ‘Intellectuals’, in G. Browning, A. Halcli and F. Webster (eds), Understanding Contemporary Society: Theories of the Present, London: Sage, 296-311.


d

Doherty, G. (ed.) (1994) Developing Quality Systems in Education, London: Routledge.

Durkheim, E. (1991) The Division of Labour in Society, London: Macmillan.


f

Foucault, M. (1984) ‘Truth and Power’, in P. Rabinow (ed.), The Foucault Reader, London: Penguin.


g

Gramsci. A. (1957a) ‘The Study of Philosophy and of Historical Materialism’, in TheModern Prince and Other Writings, ed. and trans. L. Marks, New York: International Publishers, 59-75.

——(1957b) ‘The Formation of Intellectuals’, in The Modern Prince and Other Writings, ed. and trans. L. Marks, New York: International Publishers, 118-25.


h

Hartley, D. (1995) ‘The “McDonaldisation” of Higher Education: Food for Thought?’, Oxford Review of Education 21(4):409-23.

Holub, R. (1992) Antonio Gramsci: Beyond Marxism and Postmodernism, London: Routledge.

Hughes, H.S. (1967) Consciousness and Society, London: MacGibbon & Kee.


i

Illich, I. (1973) Deschooling Society, Harmondsworth: Penguin.


j

Jacoby, R. (1987) The Last Intellectuals, New York: Basic Books.

Jary, D. and Parker, M. (eds) (1998) The New Higher Education: Issues and Directions for the Post-Dearing University, Stoke-on-Trent: Staffordshire University Press.

Johnson, T. (1972) Professions and Power, London: Macmillan.

-155-

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