International Law in the Post-Cold War World: Essays in Memory of Li Haopei

By Sienho Yee; Wang Tieya | Go to book overview

19

The legal qualification of the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia: double standards or new horizons for international humanitarian law?

Marco Sassòli*

I. Introduction

The armed conflicts in the former Yugoslavia1 have been in many respects a turning point and a challenge for international law. For International Humanitarian Law2 this is true not only because it has been systematically violated, as in many other past and contemporary conflicts, but also particularly because never before has International Humanitarian Law so frequently been invoked by the parties to the conflicts and, to a lesser extent, by third States and often abusively or at least wrongly. In addition, in no other conflict has International Humanitarian Law been so often mentioned in resolutions of the UN Security Council—and neither always correctly nor consistently. Finally, this is true because never before have the international society, i.e., States, and the international community deployed so many efforts to enforce International Humanitarian Law, including establishing for the first time since World War II a tribunal to try the violators: the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY).3 In this tribunal, the late Judge and Professor Li Haopei played an important role as a member of the Appeals Chamber. It may therefore be appropriate to honour his memory with a contribution enquiring into how the

* This article was completed in August 1999. The views expressed in this article are exclusively those of the author who would like to thank his former colleague Ms. Laura Olson for having revised and edited a first version of this text.

1 For a brief history, see Part IV below.

2 International humanitarian law of armed conflicts is the branch of international law protecting the victims of armed conflicts.

3 The International Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia since 1991, established by the Security Council through Resolution 827 (1993) of 25 May 1993 and functioning under a Statute originally published as an Annex to the Report of the Secretary-General pursuant to paragraph 2 of Security Council resolution 808 (1993), S/25704, and approved by the Security Council.

-307-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Law in the Post-Cold War World: Essays in Memory of Li Haopei
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 530

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.