Human Resource Management in Developing Countries

By Pawan S. Budhwar; Yaw A. Debrah | Go to book overview

Preface

The rapid increase in the globalisation of business and the growing significance of emerging markets suggest that the success of managers in this new century will depend on the degree to which they develop an understanding regarding the dynamics of managing human resources (HRs) in different parts of the globe. We have plenty of information regarding the management of HRs in the developed countries. However, there is a lack of information regarding the dynamics of human resource management (HRM) in developing countries. Global managers have now realised that HRM strategies vary significantly from country to country and that the strategies used to manage human resources in one country are sometimes ineffective or irrelevant in another country. With the growing significance of developing countries in the global world (as suppliers of cheap resources, buyers, competitors, capital users and home for the majority of MNCs’ foreign direct investment), both academics and practitioners need to know how HRs are managed in developing countries. This will contribute both to better theory and practice development. Hence, this book.

The challenges of management of HRs in developing countries are complex and demanding. Academics can play a significant role in this regard by providing relevant information to policy-makers and researchers. It is also important for business students—as future business leaders, to gain an understanding of the different issues relating to the management of HRs in developing countries.

The aim of this book is to provide the reader with an understanding of the dynamics of HRM in thirteen developing countries—China, South Korea, Taiwan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Algeria, Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya and South Africa. It is intended that the reader should acquire not only an understanding of the HRM functions in these countries, but more awareness of the diverse and unique configurations of national factors (cultural, institutional and business environments) which dictate HRM in cross-national settings. Such awareness will enable the reader to better understand the ‘context-specific’ nature of HRM in these countries and the need to acknowledge the strength of cross-national HRM differences.

To achieve our objective, all the contributions have been written around a set framework. It examines the influence of core national factors (i.e. national culture, national institutions, dynamic business environment and business sector) on HRM

-xvii-

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Human Resource Management in Developing Countries
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures ix
  • Tables xi
  • Foreword xv
  • Preface xvii
  • Acknowledgements xix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • References 12
  • Part I - Human Resource Management in Asia 17
  • 2 - Human Resource Management in the People’s Republic of China 19
  • 3 - Human Resource Management in South Korea 34
  • References 54
  • 4 - Human Resource Management in Taiwan 56
  • 5 - Human Resource Management in India 75
  • 6 - Human Resource Management in Nepal 91
  • 7 - Human Resource Management in Pakistan 102
  • 8 - Human Resource Management in Iran 121
  • References 133
  • 9 - Human Resource Management in Saudi Arabia 135
  • References 149
  • Part II - Human Resource Management in Africa 153
  • 10 - Human Resource Management in Algeria 155
  • References 172
  • 11 - Human Resource Management in Nigeria 174
  • References 188
  • 12 - Human Resource Management in Ghana 190
  • 13 - Human Resource Management in Kenya 209
  • 14 - Human Resource Management in South Africa 222
  • 15 - Conclusion 238
  • Subject Index 255
  • Name Index 259
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