Contemporary Britain: A Survey with Texts

By John Oakland | Go to book overview

Chapter 6

Britain and the world
Foreign policy155
1 ‘Nudging between Row and Kowtow’, 156
John Lloyd
Europe and the European Union158
2 ‘Do we need Europe?…’, 158
John Lichfield
3 ‘Europe? Oh, don’t mention it, Mr Blair’, 162
William Hague
The Euro (common currency) debate165
4 ‘A big con’, The Sun167
5 ‘The wrong continent’, 168
Larry Elliott
The Commonwealth171
6 ‘A dysfunctional family?’, 172
Magnus Linklater
Defence policy and NATO175
7 ‘The army: over-stretched and over there…’, The Economist177
8 ‘Nato is still our sword and shield…’
. 179
William Rees-Mogg
Exercises 182
Further reading 182
Notes 182

Britain’s international position as a major colonial, economic and political power was in relative decline by the early decades of the twentieth century. Some large colonies had already achieved self-governing status, and the growth of nationalism in African, Asian and West Indian countries later persuaded Britain to decolonialize further. The additional effects of increasing global competition, two World Wars, the emergence of superpower Cold War politics and domestic economic and social problems gradually forced Britain to recognize its reduced international status. It sought slowly and with difficulty to find a new identity and to establish different

-154-

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Contemporary Britain: A Survey with Texts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Chapter 1 - Contemporary Britain: the Context 1
  • Chapter 2 - Images of Britain 29
  • Chapter 3 - National Identities 60
  • Chapter 4 - Political Ideologies 90
  • Chapter 5 - Constitutional Reform 119
  • Chapter 6 - Britain and the World 154
  • Chapter 7 - Central Social Institutions 184
  • Further Reading 215
  • Chapter 8 - Social Behaviour and ‘moral Panics’ 216
  • Index 251
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